Glassdoor for Employers http://employers.glassdoor.com Mon, 27 Apr 2015 23:51:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 3 Ways Workplace Transparency Affects Employers http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/3-ways-workplace-transparency-affects-employers/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/3-ways-workplace-transparency-affects-employers/#comments Mon, 27 Apr 2015 16:00:35 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11325 How does “salary transparency” affect your hiring efforts and employee productivity? These are just some of the questions Glassdoor Chief Economist Dr. Andrew Chamberlain set out to explore in the latest Glassdoor Research report “Is Salary Transparency More Than a …Read More

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How does “salary transparency” affect your hiring efforts and employee productivity? These are just some of the questions Glassdoor Chief Economist Dr. Andrew Chamberlain set out to explore in the latest Glassdoor Research report “Is Salary Transparency More Than a Trend?. The report explores lessons from various economic literature on how workplace transparency affects labor markets.

We dug into this report to understand just how workplace transparency impacts and benefits employers. Below are three ways workplace transparency affects your company:

1. More Effective Recruiting Process

Most economists agree that the main factor driving job transparency today is the growing amount of company and job information available on sites like Glassdoor. The anonymity of the web has made it possible to safely and easily share workplace information at a scale than was ever before possible. But how is this influx in transparency benefitting employers?

Studies find that better access to job information can encourage smarter job searching, which in turn helps improve the quality of job matches. In other words, when candidates have clear expectations about a job and company, they can self-vet themselves for open positions. For employers this means having to go through fewer resumes to find quality candidates.

So here’s the skinny: salary transparency has led to candidates making more informed decisions and therefore provides more efficiency in the job market. If you’re looking for a lower cost-per-hire and more quality candidates, be transparent and encourage your employees to do the same.

2. Improves Concerns Over Gender Wage Gaps

This Glassdoor Research report highlights that salary transparency helps expose pay gaps between otherwise similar workers, encouraging underpaid employees to renegotiate or move to better-fitting jobs, again improving overall efficiency in labor markets. If your company stands strong for equal pay for equal work (and we hope it does) salary transparency can help employees feel confident that they are being paid fairly. So not only does salary transparency equalize negotiations, but it can also help reduce job uncertainty and increase the push for transparency in pay gaps.

So here’s the skinny: If you want a more satisfied workforce, try salary transparency. Don’t have employees feeling underpaid, especially your top performers, otherwise they may start to get curious if your competitor will pay better.

3. Boosts Employee Productivity

Most studies find that workplace transparency has an overall positive impact on company productivity, but there are some mixed results. So what do we know?

Transparency affects on-the-job performance in the following ways. First, when employees don’t know what others are earning, they tend to overestimate their coworkers’ pay, leading to higher levels of job dissatisfaction. Secondly, workers under a more transparent pay structure provide significantly more labor effort on average than those with no information about peer earnings.” Lastly, giving workers information about relative pay led to “a large and long-lasting increase in productivity that is costless to the firm.”

So here’s the skinny: The more transparent you are about wages, the more productive your employees will be. Instead of allowing your employees to make assumptions about what others earn, be upfront! This information should be shared freely in order to do away with distractions and encourage employee productivity.

Does salary transparency matter?

Interest in workplace transparency – both among companies and job seekers – has surged in recent years, due to the rise of sites like Glassdoor. From this brief report, several lessons from economic research and the impact of workplace transparency are clear.

More and better information in job markets leads to smarter job searching, improved fairness in pay settings, more diverse applicant pools, potentially shorter unemployment spells, smarter relocation decisions, and – at least according to the majority of published research – a more engaged and productive workforce.

Learn more in the full report, Is Salary Transparency More Than a Trend?.

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Glassdoor Introduces Pledges & Certifications for Emp... http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/glassdoor-introduces-pledges-certifications-for-employers/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/glassdoor-introduces-pledges-certifications-for-employers/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:05:35 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11305 Today, the White House is “upskilling” America with a summit focused on finding ways to help workers develop new skills that can help them move into higher paying, more senior roles. Glassdoor CEO Robert Hohman is in attendance along with …Read More

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Today, the White House is “upskilling” America with a summit focused on finding ways to help workers develop new skills that can help them move into higher paying, more senior roles. Glassdoor CEO Robert Hohman is in attendance along with Vice President Biden, Secretary of Labor Tom Perez, Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

Coinciding with this White House initiative, Glassdoor is announcing its On-the-Job Training Finder, allowing people to search and map open jobs that offer on-the-job training and pay, to help them advance their careers. As part of this, Glassdoor is making it easy for employers to verify they offer such programs with a new benefits feature, Pledges & Certifications.

Glassdoor now offering distinctions for Pledges & Certifications

Last summer, Glassdoor introduced Benefits Reviews & Ratings, and since then thousands of companies have verified the benefits they offer employees. Now, Glassdoor is giving employers another valuable resource to distinguish themselves and stand out, based on programs they offer and/or employment pledges they have made. These initial Pledges & Certifications include:

  • Veteran Hiring Commitment
  • Pay Equality Pledge
  • Tech Hiring Commitment
  • Career Advancement Program
  • Social Responsibility Pledge
  • Diversity Commitment
  • Registered Apprenticeships

Employer branding opportunity awaits

Now, employers simply need to log in using a Free Employer Account, visit their employer centers, and select the certifications and pledges that their company is committed to providing. Just select ‘Edit Profile,’ then click ‘Benefits’ to the left-hand side of the screen and you’ll have instant access.

Glassdoor Employer Center Access

Once you’re in, you can select as many pledges and certifications that your company is committed to providing. Currently, there are seven to choose from.

Glassdoor Employer Center Pledges and Certifications

Once complete, your Glassdoor profile will indicate your Pledges & Certifications on the right side panel of your benefits tab.

Enterprise Employer Profile Glassdoor Pledges and Certiifications

Furthermore, once you verify your company’s Pledges & Certifications, you will increase candidate awareness by automatically being included in Glassdoor’s dynamic lists. Updated regularly, these lists showcase all employers who verify their commitments to:

Employers everywhere should be recognized for their honorable commitments and Glassdoor is proud to work alongside the White House in our efforts to upskill Americans.

To highlight your own company’s benefits, or official programs and certifications, request a Free Employer Account, log in to your employer center and begin updating today.

If you represent an organization that helps people find jobs or upskill, and you’re interested in integrating Glassdoor’s On-the-Job Training Finder into your own website, simply register for API access on Glassdoor.

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How To: Transition From Agency to In-House Recruiting http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/how-to-transition-from-agency-to-in-house-recruiting/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/how-to-transition-from-agency-to-in-house-recruiting/#comments Wed, 22 Apr 2015 16:00:35 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11299 There are fundamental differences in strategy between agency-style recruiting and being in-house. The purpose of this post isn’t to promote one recruiting style over the other, but rather to give perspective on the best fit for you and how to transition …Read More

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There are fundamental differences in strategy between agency-style recruiting and being in-house. The purpose of this post isn’t to promote one recruiting style over the other, but rather to give perspective on the best fit for you and how to transition if you choose to.

Finding the right fit

Recruiting is a funky cross between sales and HR. Instead of selling a defined product to a customer, you’re essentially playing professional matchmaker – like Tinder, but matching job seekers and companies instead. How you bring these people in isn’t really that important – whether agency or in-house, it’s all about preference.

So, which one is right for you? If you’re more inclined to manage your client portfolio and measure deliverables from a purely financial sense, an agency is your best bet. If your interests are more along the lines of building an organization piece by piece, go in-house.

Prioritizing your requisition load

Plain and simple, being in-house means you can’t ignore positions. You have to be on top of your game, always. Instead of being able to pick and choose which jobs you’ll focus on and which can fall to the bottom of the barrel, in-house recruiting requires an equal focus on all positions, not just easy-to-fill roles or those that will be the most profitable.

When taking an in-house approach, the first step is figuring out which positions are most important for your business and which have the potential to cause major bottlenecks. Though you have to balance your requisition load and ensure all openings get equal attention, these will have to be prioritized based on need.

From there, move on to analytics. If a certain role is seeing a steady flow of applicants, it wouldn’t make sense to spend time and resources sourcing for it. If you have a high priority role with a weak candidate flow, you will need to carve out time to market your positions to the right people.

Managing employer brand vs. your own

One of the biggest tools missing in agency recruiting is being able to leverage brand. The most successful agency recruiters have a personal brand that encourages trust between candidates and generates referral business.

Therefore, a huge advantage of in-house recruiting is being able to leverage your brand. Showcase your culture (and not only that – boast it!). Your messaging should reference as much information as possible that promotes your brand. This could mean many things, from linking to your company reviews on Glassdoor, social media pages or even relevant blogs or team videos.

Which metrics matter?

There’s a wide variety of agencies out there, from boutiques to conglomerates. For the purposes of this post, let’s focus on the conglomerates. Many agencies have metrics that are similar to a sales organization, putting focus on metrics like attempted contacts, phone conversations, submittals and deal profits.

Oftentimes, this can lead to micromanaging within agencies. When moving in-house, these metrics are handled differently. At Glassdoor, there are two things we view as most important to measure: fills and interview feedback.

Ultimately, if you’re not producing, you’re slowing the entire organization down, which is why number of fills is so crucial. The expectation isn’t to make 100 calls a day – it’s more about closing your requisitions whatever way you can.

Interview feedback is the second key metric we measure in-house. Each recruiter should own this part of the recruiting process – it’s up to them to stay informed with Glassdoor feedback to make sure their team is assessing the right things and representing the company well.

The battle is on: in-house vs. agency

An in-house team is a marketing machine with a strong personal sales focus, while the agency model presses harder on sales and direct outreach. However, the most effective recruiters use a blend of each strategy.

To learn more about recruiting with agencies, check out our blog post Working With Recruiting Agencies? What You Need to Know!

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5 Reasons Employers Should Focus on Candidate Experience http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-reasons-employers-should-focus-on-candidate-experience-2/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-reasons-employers-should-focus-on-candidate-experience-2/#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 16:00:28 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11288 Building your employer brand is tricky, and at the center of it all lies the candidate experience. A positive candidate experience is critical in building a strong employer brand. Just as you focus on your products and how you message …Read More

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Building your employer brand is tricky, and at the center of it all lies the candidate experience. A positive candidate experience is critical in building a strong employer brand. Just as you focus on your products and how you message them, focusing on your employer brand will help you look at candidates as customers – all the same rules apply.

Your engagement with candidates defines their impression of both your company and employer brand – and those first impressions are lasting. This is why it’s so important to be on your game in every interview and train your team so they can put their best foot forward on your company’s behalf.

Here are five compelling reasons to focus more on perfecting your candidate experience:

1. Word travels fast. We live in a digital age where, whether you like it or not, people are sharing their experiences online. Whether they’re buying a camera or reviewing a mediocre interview experience, it’s easy for people to share their experiences.

Don’t look at this as something to be afraid of – instead, use it to your advantage. According to a Glassdoor survey, 94% are likely to apply to a job if the employer actively manages their employer brand, which includes responding to reviews. Join the conversation and get involved if you want candidates to apply.

2. Competition is tough. These days, companies are known almost as much for the quality of their workplace as the quality of their products or services. Sure, it’s great to make a killer product, but if you aren’t a great place to work, what’s the point? Remember: 69% would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed! Your ability to compete in the marketplace and stay ahead is directly related to your ability to attract and retain top talent.

3. First impressions count. The second a candidate receives a follow-up email, steps foot onsite or meets a team member, they’re sizing you up. And, many of them have already done their research on Glassdoor and have an initial impression of your company from the get-go. A candidate’s first impression of your company will stay with them throughout the entire process – so make it count. Similarly, a bad candidate experience can translate into a bad impression of your products or services, and that is never good for business.

To deal with this, ensure that you take those little steps to go above and beyond. Send personalized follow-up emails to candidates and make sure that every applicant receives a response, regardless of if it’s negative or positive. Train your team on how to properly interview, to always offer drinks or snacks when candidates arrive onsite, and how to handle tough interview situations. Taking the extra time to make candidates feel welcome and important will really set you apart as an employer.

4. How would you like to be treated? One of the most powerful things an employer can do is put themselves in the candidates shoes. Think back to when you interviewed last. What stands out about the process? Was it negative or positive, and why? What elements of a company’s employer brand mattered to you?

Asking yourself these questions and putting yourself in the candidate’s place will help you relate and stay ahead. It’s important to nail down exactly how you want candidates to leave your company feeling – then build your process around that end goal.

5. Don’t burn bridges – instead, build brand advocates. While many candidates may be no-go’s right now, businesses change and new opportunities can arise without notice. Candidates that may not be the best fit now could work in a few months or even a year, so never burn those bridges.

To ensure you’re never ruining relationships, always communicate transparently with candidates and be as upfront as humanly possible. Don’t ever just not respond to candidates for months on end – that will put a sour taste in their mouths. Instead, be proactive and honest. Everyone you interview (but don’t hire) should be glad to hear from you if you ever reach out in the future. Plus, this will leave you with a large, talented candidate pool to reach out to if the opportunity ever arises.

A combination of a good process around your recruiting and hiring function, and a laser focus on the candidate experience will build a strong Employer Brand, help you attract and retain rock star candidates and employees, and drive your business success!

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How To Embrace Self-Service HR http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/embrace-self-service-hr/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/embrace-self-service-hr/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 16:00:58 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10372 DIY is the norm for many aspects of our lives and that is now true of human resources departments. Countless companies of all sizes are adopting self-service human resources, aiming to cut costs, free HR professionals to recruit and retain …Read More

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DIY is the norm for many aspects of our lives and that is now true of human resources departments. Countless companies of all sizes are adopting self-service human resources, aiming to cut costs, free HR professionals to recruit and retain and meet the needs of their tech savvy millennial employees.

But not every company is doing it right. More often than not, HR departments are launching these Internet based services with little thought or training, resulting in a workforce that is frustrated and not using the services designed to help them.

Companies “are doing a ton of things right but are also making a lot of mistakes” when it comes to moving to self-service, says Ben Peterson, chief executive and co-founder of BambooHR, the HR software company. “It requires a lot of meaningful thought on how to roll it out to employees.”

Human resources has changed

Rewind a few years and human resources department were tasked with a lot of job functions. Onboarding, off boarding and making sure employees had the correct benefits were only part of their job role. But doing those mundane tasks like changing an employee status or researching coverage took them away from recruiting and retaining key employees to the company. Software automates a lot of those processes, making it easier for the staff to get basic information and make changes and at the same time lets the HR professionals help grow the business by finding and keeping key talent.

Self-service HR can also bring together disparate HR systems into one place, making it easier for everyone to manage and access them. “One of the problems that a lot of companies have with HR systems is that they’re all scattered across a bunch of different providers,” says Parker Conrad, founder and chief executive of Zenefits, the HR software company. “You have one account and login for payroll, another one for health insurance, another one for commuter benefits, and so on.”

Implementing self-service HR

While every company is different and so are their needs when it comes to self-service HR, in general companies that implement this software can enable employees to easily update personal records, enroll in benefits and view personal data such as payroll, paid time off and retirement benefits. “Employees enter the data once and can check to ensure the information is correct without a trip to the HR Department, where they might have to complete forms and then have an administrative HR or payroll personnel process the data,” says Laura Kerekes, chief knowledge officer at Think HR, the human resources consulting company. “HR self-service removes the hassle factor for employees viewing their data or making changes themselves, empowers managers to better manage their people issues by having the right real-time data, and transforms the internal HR function from focusing on transaction processing to more important workforce issues.”

In a perfect world you would roll out the software, give a little training and within a few days everyone would be using it all the time. But the reality is change is hard and getting employees comfortable with the new system requires a lot of preparation up front.

Understand priorities and goals

Since usability is the major driver of employee engagement and adoption, Pat Pickren, senior director of product strategy for Ultimate Software, the HR software company, says companies have to make sure they are adopting a simple solution that doesn’t require employees to spend hours trying to figure out how to use it. Long before the roll out, Pickren says you have to understand the priorities of the executives and how this will help them reach their goals. You also want to establish a way to demonstrate a ROI to ensure you are getting the cost savings you were aiming for. Ensuring adoption happens starts with the human resources department. According to Pickren every member of the HR and payroll teams has to know how to use the software and what will be available online. “These teams also must understand that they should direct employees to the portal for these documents or forms rather than faxing/emailing the documents to employees or performing the functions for employees as they might have previously done,” says Pickren.

One of the best ways to get employees to use self-service HR is to have a great experience from the beginning. If the first interaction with the software is bad, chances are employees will avoid using it or put it off for when they have time to navigate it. But if one or two clicks gets them to the right place from the start the likelihood of them using it increases. You also don’t want to throw everything HR related at the employees in the beginning. Peterson of BambooHR says to start off slow and once the staff is comfortable implement more self-service tools. “Software should work for you, not something you work on,” says Peterson. “You are hiring software to do a job and you need to define what the job is.”

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How Authentic Are Your Employee Value Propositions? http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/authentic-employee-value-propositions/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/authentic-employee-value-propositions/#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 16:00:08 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10288 Marketing has become an integral part of talent strategy. The use of messages and branding to foster engagement, attract candidates and retain employees have resulted in some organizations thoughtfully and others inadvertently developing employee value propositions (EVP’s). EVP’s are messages …Read More

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Marketing has become an integral part of talent strategy.

The use of messages and branding to foster engagement, attract candidates and retain employees have resulted in some organizations thoughtfully and others inadvertently developing employee value propositions (EVP’s). EVP’s are messages that articulate what an employee can expect when they work for the company. The promises. Most of the messages, in one way or another, tend to emphasize employee development and career progression (like the image above). Branding supplements the message by offering visual images of what an employee can experience when they’re in the organization.

EVP’s impact talent sourcing and retention

The ability to deliver against EVP’s can have a tangible impact on both talent sourcing and retention. Talent functions must realize the authenticity of an EVP will be compared to real employee experiences through social media channels. Research has shown there is a direct correlation between employer reviews on social media and job application follow through. In a recent US study of more than 4,600 job seekers; almost 50% of them used social sites like Glassdoor to research the company as part of their job search strategy[1]. Employee reviews have greater influence on which companies candidates will choose that more closely aligns with their values. In the example to the right the EVP advertised career progression, but the employee review exposed this as a misrepresentation. Candidates who value career advancement may choose not to apply to that company based on the review.

EVP is not only important for talent attraction, it’s also important to retain your current talent bench. Consider the following true story and how it reflects on the genuineness of the EVP.

Why you must commit to advancement

A friend of mine choose to work at a company that articulated messages of career progression and development in the job description, website, branding and interview processes. As an employee, she worked hard to build great relationships and develop her skill set. Messages about commitment to career development and progression were continuously communicated in town halls, intranet sites, emails and corporate communications. After a few years she felt ready to move to the next level within her carer tract. With consistently great performance reviews, she anticipated an easy conversation with her Manager on formulating a plan. She raised the subject about career advancement. Her boss listened to her and after a brief pause said; “You’ll need some of these first (pointing to her grey hair) if you want to move up”. In one short sentence the conversation had ended. The employee had taken her Manager’s comments as a clear message that seniority was equal to age. She knew she would not be advancing anytime soon.

Completely disengaged, within three months she resigned and went to a direct competitor.

Of course not every employee is pegged for progression. However, this story is reflective of a top performer who believed the company was committed to advancement, irrespective of age. The revelation that the EVP was false (from her perspective) resulted in her becoming disconnected, disengaged and demotivated. No surprise, she does not endorse this company as a great place to work to her network or family. This is a tangible example that the smaller the gap between your EVP promise and delivery; the higher your retention rate can be.

What you can do to create genuine EVP’s

  1. Solicit feedback/crowdsource regularly to understand what works and what can be improved. Don’t rely on annual engagement surveys to assess how people feel. Solicit genuine feedback regularly through different mediums. Highlight what is working and document what could be improved.
  2. Action feedback to address gaps. I can’t stress this enough. Feedback is abundant on ways to improve. Yet so often nothing is actually done to address it. Demonstrate you are listening to your employees by actioning feedback. If you don’t it will be seen as disingenuous.
  3. Update your EVP with endorsed content– Your EVP is only genuine if your employees endorse it. Update it with validated content so it is authentic.
  4. Revisit your EVP every 3-5 years to align it to your strategy. The workforce is changing. Your strategy changes. Your EVP should be reflective of your strategy.
  5. Use employees to promote genuine EVP messages through social media channels. Many companies are afraid of employee reviews on social media sites. They tend to want to “shut it down” or ignore it hoping it will go away. Instead embrace social media sites and build it into your strategy. Provide alternative, genuine employee experiences on sites like Glassdoor and Indeed to help job seekers make an informed decision about your company.

There are lots of opportunities to build genuine EVP’s. I hope these few ideas will help you to start thinking about ways to develop authentic messages!

Have questions or comments? I would love to hear from you! Feel free to contact me via Twitter or LinkedIn.

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10 Free Ways to Improve Your Employer Brand http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/10-free-ways-to-improve-your-employer-brand/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/10-free-ways-to-improve-your-employer-brand/#comments Thu, 16 Apr 2015 16:00:17 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11269 “How do we manage our employer brand without dedicated headcount?” “Are there any simple ways to improve our employer brand with a limited budget or no budget at all?” We field questions like these all the time from employers. That’s …Read More

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“How do we manage our employer brand without dedicated headcount?”

“Are there any simple ways to improve our employer brand with a limited budget or no budget at all?”

We field questions like these all the time from employers. That’s why we came up with a handy guide full of great advice for organizations looking to improve or upgrade their employer brand.

For example, responding to a company review takes less than five minutes and can give candidates a clear perspective on what it’s like to work at your company. Social media can help you promote your company story, job openings and upcoming events to job seekers researching your company. Encouraging employees to share this content on their social networks is a great way to amplify your efforts even more.

That’s just a taste of what you can do! For more good tips, check our “Ten Ways to Improve Your Employer Brand” infographic and register for our upcoming webinar.

Free-Employer-Branding-Tips

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How Diversity Fuels Innovation http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/how-diversity-fuels-innovation/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/how-diversity-fuels-innovation/#comments Thu, 09 Apr 2015 16:00:42 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11245 There’s been a lot of attention lately on the topic of diversity: in society, in the workplace, in business, and—particularly for women—in the technology industry. As a woman who’s made her career in tech, I’ve certainly felt a major shift …Read More

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There’s been a lot of attention lately on the topic of diversity: in society, in the workplace, in business, and—particularly for women—in the technology industry. As a woman who’s made her career in tech, I’ve certainly felt a major shift in attitudes over the years—both in others and also personally.

When I first started in the industry, I was always conscious of not wanting to stand out for anything but my work. Determined to fit in and get along as “just one of the guys,” I didn’t want anyone making an issue of my gender—and I certainly would never make it an issue myself. But over the years, I’ve gradually recognized that, as a woman, I bring unique—and valuable—perspectives to the projects I’m working on.

Working on MICA

A perfect example is MICA (My Intelligent Communication Accessory), a connected bracelet designed for the socially connected woman in partnership with Opening Ceremony—a leading fashion house and retailer.

I’m proud that my involvement in the project has helped to shape both the design and functionality of the final product. I recall early exploratory conversations where I’d explain to mostly male colleagues that many women, unlike most men, don’t keep their phones in instantly accessible pant or jacket pockets, where every beep is heard or vibration felt. By contrast, women—who often keep their phones in purses—frequently experience considerable delays in receiving communications that most men would receive nearly instantly. I remember telling my colleagues: “You know those moments when you try to reach your wife, and she doesn’t answer her phone—well it’s probably because the phone is in her purse.” They smiled in newfound appreciation for the problem statement.

The ideal smart bracelet experience for women, then, would provide easily accessible “glanceable” content—like important emails, a babysitter’s text message, or fashion news. And it would do all this while looking and feeling like a genuine piece of jewelry—something I’d actually buy at Barneys New York.

What resulted was a jewelry piece that’s at the forefront of the wearable tech device era, which converges fashion and technology—integrating a woman’s luxury accessory with technology features and functionality that complement and enhance a woman’s work and social life. While the team always had ambitious goals, I could never have imagined an Intel technology-based wearable being covered in Vogue. So it was a pleasant surprise when I recently found myself reading about MICA in the fashion magazine’s April 2015 issue.

This is just one personal example of how companies benefit when they are inclusive and welcoming of diverse perspectives—but there are many others.

The business case for diversity

The business case for companies to be more inclusive of women has been well documented in recent years—and has only grown more compelling. According to Forbes, women globally control $20 trillion in annual consumer spending—and this number continues to grow. Women are responsible for 80 percent of all consumer spending—and have been for a long time. So it’s becoming increasingly essential for businesses of all types to have diverse voices within the company that truly grasp this huge market opportunity, in all its complexities.

By the same token, on the employment side, there’s been plenty of data demonstrating that equitable workforce diversity leads to higher business profitability. According to a recent report by Catalyst (“The Bottom Line: Corporate Performance and Women’s Representation on Boards”), Fortune 500 companies with the highest representation of women board directors achieved significantly higher financial performance, on average, than those with the lowest representation of women board directors. Moreover, the report reveals notably stronger-than-average performance at companies with three or more women board directors.

Why diversity makes a difference

Having a diverse workforce across all business functions and levels of authority is important (and profitable) for two primary reasons. First, diversity contributes significantly to innovation. A room full of diverse perspectives fuels creativity, drives thought-provoking conversations, challenges prevailing perspectives, and offers a new approach to solutions for vexing problems. Imagine the collective creative intelligence in a room full of diverse individuals versus that of a room full of sameness.

Secondly, a diverse workforce reflects—and gives companies better insights—into their increasingly diverse customer base. As globalized markets have expanded participation among diverse populations, having individuals within your organization that truly understand your varied customers—their culture, values, ideas, and thinking—will necessarily make your organization more effective.

The last word

I always tell people that it’s a privilege to be a woman in today’s business environments. We are transforming the workforce, bringing unique perspectives, and ultimately helping companies become more successful. We should be fearless about speaking up, having a seat at the table, highlighting the micro-inequities we sometimes face, and ultimately fighting for the next generations to follow.

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Your Comprehensive #GDRoadshow Recap http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/your-comprehensive-gdroadshow-recap/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/your-comprehensive-gdroadshow-recap/#comments Wed, 08 Apr 2015 16:00:27 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11240 During our recent Glassdoor Best Places to Work Roadshow, over 4,000 talent acquisition professionals, HR teams and marketers gathered around the globe for eight in-person events and one virtual live stream from San Francisco, networking over coffee and bacon while …Read More

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During our recent Glassdoor Best Places to Work Roadshow, over 4,000 talent acquisition professionals, HR teams and marketers gathered around the globe for eight in-person events and one virtual live stream from San Francisco, networking over coffee and bacon while learning what it takes to become a Best Place to Work.

Viewers and attendees took to Twitter to join the conversation, leaving comments like, “Don’t ignore the conversation, engagement is key. Embrace the generation of transparency!”

Want to hear more? Southerly published a great article on what the Glassdoor Best Places to Work winners can teach you about engaging employees, while the #GDRoadshow hashtag on Twitter went overtime with employer branding and employee engagement insights.

So, what were the main takeaways from the event? Check the infographic below and these videos from the virtual event in San Francisco.

GD_BPTWRoadshow_Recap_Infographic_Final

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Why Transparency Is Good for Business http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/why-transparency-is-good-for-business/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/why-transparency-is-good-for-business/#comments Tue, 07 Apr 2015 16:00:04 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11228 One of the most frequent questions I get asked in my job is “how has HubSpot’s culture changed since you became a public company in October?” I love that question because the short answer is “very little,” and it’s a …Read More

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One of the most frequent questions I get asked in my job is “how has HubSpot’s culture changed since you became a public company in October?” I love that question because the short answer is “very little,” and it’s a direct result of our commitment to transparency.

As organizations grow, the default playbook is to add more complexity, rules, and regulations to “standardize” everything you do. This temptation becomes even greater as you go through an initial public offering because you’re surrounded by lawyers, bankers and accountants, who are all too willing to share catastrophic scenarios to scare you into legislating good behavior instead of hiring great people and trusting them.

At HubSpot, our founders were adamant: we would do everything required of us from a compliance perspective, but we would maintain our commitment to being as transparent as possible as an organization. We’ve stayed true to this commitment, even designating all of our employees as insiders so that we can continue our practice of sharing as much information as possible with team members at every level. But on a basic level, why does transparency matter to your company, to your brand, and your employees? Below I’ve outlined just a few of the reasons it matters to us:

1. Remarkable Employees Want Insight Into Your Business: The top employees in your business, whether they are programmers, recruiters, or sales people, have many competitive options for where to work, and one of the many things that can influence their decision is an ability to truly and deeply understand your business. At HubSpot, we solve decisions with transparency instead of titles, and the information we share organization-wide allows employees to roll up their sleeves and create innovative solutions to the most challenging elements of our business. That access is really appealing to up-and-coming interns and new employees, because they feel empowered to speak up about things we can do better as an organization or problems we should tackle with a different approach. Providing top-tier employees with transparency and autonomy to innovate across the business can be a powerful weapon in a highly competitive market for talent.

glassdoor-culture-code-quotes

2. Sunlight is the Best Disinfectant: One central tenet of HubSpot widely-read Culture Code is Louis Brandeis’s quote that “sunlight is the best disinfectant.” No matter what business you’re in or what stage of growth you’re experiencing, people will make mistakes. Handled correctly, failure can be an extremely effective form of organizational learning. But when you create a culture devoid of transparency, employees often conceal failure, and doing so can be lethal to your company. Not only does this practice make it more likely that employees are hiding behavior that is less than admirable, it also makes failure a four letter word, and that’s the fastest way for your company to regress to the mean. Don’t hoard information; share it widely–doing so will give you better ideas, better insights, and ultimately better behavior from everyone in your organization.

3. It Puts You Ahead on an Inevitable Shift: Social media and Glassdoor have fundamentally transformed what candidates know about your company–you can no longer sit in an ivory tower and build your employment brand with brochures and trade fairs. The proliferation of information and data externally has made the recruiting and employment world inherently more transparent, and rewarded companies that have long valued openness and transparency as part of their brand, like Google and Expedia. So while it’s possible in 2015 to resist this trend internally, it’s an uphill battle that you’re inevitably going to lose. The internet is making any information more available, so embracing transparency represents a fundamental understanding of how the world is changing, which can only improve how you adapt, transform, market and sell to your customers.

In a recent survey from INSEAD, North American Millennials cited “empowering employees” as the top trait they sought out in management. The single most effective way to empower employees at every level of your business is by giving them the data and autonomy to think big, solve interesting problems, and truly learn your business well beyond their division. Transparency done right will help you recruit top talent, retain exceptional employees, and foster innovation throughout your company, and every organization can benefit from that.

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