Glassdoor for Employers http://employers.glassdoor.com Wed, 27 May 2015 21:51:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 My Name is Ed, Recovering Glassdoor Hater http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/my-name-is-ed-recovering-glassdoor-hater/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/my-name-is-ed-recovering-glassdoor-hater/#comments Wed, 27 May 2015 16:00:26 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11482 This is my first time at one of these “Recovering Glassdoor Hater” meetings, so I’m not sure what the protocol is. Listening to your stories so far, I can empathize with how painful it must be for many to be …Read More

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This is my first time at one of these “Recovering Glassdoor Hater” meetings, so I’m not sure what the protocol is. Listening to your stories so far, I can empathize with how painful it must be for many to be here.

I see among us people at all skill levels and years of experience in talent acquisition, in various industries and from locations around the world. I think we all remember how we brushed off Glassdoor as a nuisance a year or two ago. I, for one, definitely saw Glassdoor as an enemy to my efforts rather than a partner.

Ouch! That really hurt to say. But everyone here knows it’s true. I was with all of you haters in recent years and went so far as to blast Glassdoor and mock those who got in early. But now, I know Glassdoor isn’t going anywhere – it’s the present and future of our industry. And while that’s painful to say, it’s taught me a lot.

What Glassdoor taught me

So now it’s time to join the chorus. I’ve learned Glassdoor is not just a platform for the disenfranchised, nor is it like a Festivus “airing of the grievances” session. Rather, it’s an embrace of what a real employment brand strategy should be – honest, open and transparent.

Sure, we all know some Glassdoor reviews are simply sour grapes posted by bitter ex-employees. We have all learned that while in some cases that’s true, more often than not the feedback on Glassdoor is viable and worthwhile. The world has changed, and so too has our space – candidates these days have more than just options – they have information. And that’s powerful.

Information readily available to job seekers everywhere can either help or hurt your efforts as recruiters and talent leaders. Either choose to embrace it and help drive the narrative or let the narrative drive you.

Glassdoor’s product

To be completely transparent, Glassdoor’s product development over the past year or two is what convinced me I had a problem being a Glassdoor hater. Instead of just being a “Yelp for employers,” Glassdoor began offering employers tools we need to drive our brand on a site that gets a ton of traffic and terrific SEO results. As you can tell, I’ve definitely drunk the Kool-Aid and am no longer a Glassdoor hater.

For those of you who are still questioning Glassdoor and how it can benefit your business, here are three steps to recovery I suggest you take:

1. Wear it loud and proud. As an employer, I spent much of my time on platforms other than Glassdoor developing my employer brand, but let’s be honest – when someone is researching your organization, they are likely to stumble across your Glassdoor profile. Instead of just hoping people will look away, embrace this!

For example, the Company Updates feature to share what’s great about your company and culture. Put up fun photos and videos, just as you would on any other platform. Link to all your social accounts and, by all means, link to your Glassdoor reviews on your careers page. If you own it loud and proud, Glassdoor will help you, not hurt you.

2. Be real. As we all start to embrace Glassdoor and see employer branding in a new light, my advice is to understand that “business speak” is not how you should market your employer brand.

My advice? Be authentic. People sniff out corporate jargon and BS pretty quickly. If you promote who and what you are and truly have an awesome culture, then the reviews on Glassdoor should sync with how you brand yourself. Hint: random quotes, stock imagery or too much text are no-no’s on Glassdoor.

3. Encourage. Here’s another tip: encourage your employees to join the conversation on Glassdoor. I know this can be the scariest step, especially if you’re not sure what your employees are going to say about you anonymously. Explain how leaving reviews helps your organization – it’s the same as encouraging employees to become brand ambassadors on social media, just a different platform.

What’s great about Glassdoor, too, is that it is completely anonymous. What doesn’t work, however, is when you see clearly “company forced” reviews. In short, encourage your employees but don’t push or bribe.

Thanks so much to everyone here for sharing their stories. I was really nervous at first but your support means a lot. My journey, like yours, was hard and we all have our battle scars.

In closing, my name is Ed and I used to be a Glassdoor hater – not anymore.

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Who in Your Org Should Own Glassdoor? http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/who-in-your-org-should-own-glassdoor/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/who-in-your-org-should-own-glassdoor/#comments Tue, 26 May 2015 16:00:42 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11472 There are many reasons people visit Glassdoor. Some are looking for jobs and researching companies while others are comparing salaries and analyzing industry trends. Some come to do all of these. However, the number one reason people visit Glassdoor is …Read More

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There are many reasons people visit Glassdoor. Some are looking for jobs and researching companies while others are comparing salaries and analyzing industry trends. Some come to do all of these. However, the number one reason people visit Glassdoor is to search for a job.

As an employer, how is your company attracting candidates searching for jobs on Glassdoor? And who in your organization is getting involved?

There are many different internal departments that can add value to your company’s Glassdoor page. Here are a few departments that should have a stake in your company’s Glassdoor profile, and why they’re qualified to take on this responsibility:

1. PR and Marketing

Traditionally, PR and Marketing control much of the content produced at any organization. Whether it’s writing blog posts, crafting messages for Twitter feeds or authoring eBooks, these teams should be publicizing your organization’s message loud and clear.

They are also typically up-to-date on new messaging, brand guidelines and approved company stats, which can come in handy when managing a Glassdoor profile. Social media (which typically falls under PR or Marketing) can be a valuable asset when updating your Company Updates on Glassdoor, gaining new followers and building an engaged community on your company’s Glassdoor profile.

2. Recruiting

Your recruiting team is probably very familiar with recruiting platforms like Glassdoor, tweaking job descriptions and targeting job ads to the correct audience. They also are great at making sure the right people are applying to your jobs – and, if they aren’t, they know what to change to get more applicants.

Your recruiting team is a great choice to manage your Glassdoor profile (or at least help out) because they’re probably comfortable with monitoring engagement, analyzing candidate demographics and promoting jobs to the right audiences. All these skills come in handy on Glassdoor.

3. Leadership teams

Leadership teams are a smart choice to manage your Glassdoor profile for one very strong reason: they often take the majority of the responsibility for what’s being said about your organization and are involved in determining your employee value proposition and company’s culture.

We encourage CEOs, executives and leadership teams to get involved and join the conversation on Glassdoor and monitor what is being said about them to ensure it matches their message. Many leaders at companies around the world personally respond to reviews on behalf of their organizations. The success of your efforts on sites like Glassdoor depends on your leadership team’s willingness to listen to employees and make internal changes to help their organizations grow.

4. C-Level executives

For many C-Level execs, your organization is their baby. Whether they’ve been at the helm since day one or are relatively new, they have been given a great responsibility to oversee every aspect of your organization.

Many times, the well-being of employees is the most important thing in executives’ minds. Responding to reviews – both positive and negative – at an executive level shows your organization values feedback and transparency. Sixty-nine percent of job seekers say their perception improves when an executive responds to a Glassdoor review. Be sure to check out our 3 Reasons CEOs Should Care About Glassdoor eBook for even more reasons to get your leaders involved on Glassdoor.

These are just a few examples of how companies can engage many different internal departments to take control of your company’s employer brand on Glassdoor. The most successful companies truly make this a team effort!

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The Cost of a Disengaged Employee http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/the-cost-of-a-disengaged-employee/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/the-cost-of-a-disengaged-employee/#comments Mon, 25 May 2015 19:00:26 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11444 Seventy-percent of the American workforce is made up of disengaged employees. Fortunately, there are ways to combat these costs if you understand what disengaged employees are, how they affect your business and steps you can take to turn them into …Read More

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Seventy-percent of the American workforce is made up of disengaged employees. Fortunately, there are ways to combat these costs if you understand what disengaged employees are, how they affect your business and steps you can take to turn them into brand ambassadors.

First, let’s define an engaged employee. Engaged employees work with passion and feel a profound connection to their company. They drive innovation and will ultimately move the organization forward.

Disengaged employees, on the other hand, are essentially “checked out”. They’re sleepwalking through their workday and may be putting in the time, but lack passion and energy.

Lastly, actively disengaged employees aren’t just unhappy at work – they’re busy acting out their unhappiness. Every day, these workers undermine what their engaged co-workers accomplish. They aren’t just unhappy, but they’re aggressively lowering morale and productivity levels. These people can be a real danger to any organization.

Of all these employees, you really need to watch out for actively disengaged employees who, for every one step forward, bring your organization two steps back. However, any level of disengagement can damage your culture, brand and finances.

How disengaged employees affect culture

When it comes to company culture, it’s important to share the same vision across your organization. Are disengaged employees going to share your vision with the same passion engaged employees have for you culture? People that are “putting time – but not energy or passion – into their work” discount the hard work of the engaged 30% of the workforce that is driving your company forward.

Chew on this: people are likely to share a good experience with three people, but will share a bad one with 10 or more. Don’t let this happen to you! By allowing disengaged employees to continue working for you, you risk losing engaged employees.

How disengaged employees affect your brand

Building an employer brand is no small feat – it can take a while to build. Don’t let all of your hard work to collapse from the inside by mismanaging disengaged employees. Your greatest brand ambassadors are the people you employ, helping you to not only promote your brand to customers but also to potential candidates.

When an employee is disengaged, the snippets they share with the world can be neutral and aren’t necessarily always negative, but they still aren’t the positive expressions needed to make your company stand out from the competition.

It’s important to stand out from the competition to gain a recruiting advantage, especially when 84% would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent reputation.

How disengaged employees affect your bottom line

Besides brand and culture, there’s one more area that can be extremely affected by disengaged employees: your bottom line. Disengaged employees are estimated to cost the U.S. between $450 billion to $550 billion, according to a Gallup poll. And, according to a CareerBuilder study, 69% of employers say they’ve been negatively affected by a bad hire in the past year. Forty-one percent believe this cost their organization over $25,000, while 24% said it cost them more than $50,000.

Your disengaged employees are sleepwalking through the day, but worse than that, they’re potentially costing your company billions. Ultimately, turning this employees into engaged employees and ultimate brand ambassadors will leave you with happier customers, increased creativity levels and less sick days taken by your employees. Engaged employees are fundamental to the success of your business.

Quick ways to solve disengagement

Don’t lose what your company is working so hard to achieve! The costs to your culture, brand and bottom line aren’t worth it when there are simple actions you can take to reengage employees. It can take some time to do so, but biting off a few of these items at a time can help you move in the right direction.

  • Take in feedback. Read what your past and current employees are saying about you on Glassdoor. View your word cloud to see positive and negative themes arising among your employees.
  • Do something about it. Don’t just take in feedback – do something to change. Discuss what’s happening on review sites like Glassdoor with your management team.
  • Make a plan to engage your employees. Here are some tips we have for engaging your current workforce! It can also be helpful to compile all ideas into one place. Whether it’s an Excel spreadsheet, your Glassdoor profile or a Word document, keep all of your feedback in one place and make a plan.
  • Ask your employees to provide feedback honesty and regularly. This will help you see how people are responding to the changes you are making, what you can still do to improve and the health of your overall organization. Also, get buy-in from employees on your messaging and employer brand – their opinion counts.

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What Contingent Workers Really Want http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/contingent-workers-really-want/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/contingent-workers-really-want/#comments Mon, 25 May 2015 16:00:05 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10312 More and more companies today are using contingent workers (aka freelancers and contractors) to fill performance gaps. Whether they use these workers to manage peak business needs, fill critical roles on complex projects, or to handle the extra work that …Read More

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More and more companies today are using contingent workers (aka freelancers and contractors) to fill performance gaps. Whether they use these workers to manage peak business needs, fill critical roles on complex projects, or to handle the extra work that comes in a rapid growth stage, contingent labor has become a critical workplace strategy. And it’s only going to increase as companies see the benefits of using these temporary laborers.

According to a recent study by Ardent Partners, temporary labor use will increase by nearly 30 percent over the next three years, and 62 percent of organizations cited contingent labor as a ‘vital component to achieving their primary goals and objectives’ in 2014.

Yet companies aren’t going to achieve those goals unless they create better processes for attracting and managing this unique category of workers. The best contingent laborers don’t come on-board for a single project then disappear. They often become a part of the corporate culture, returning on a regular basis for specific projects, or to support the need for subject matter experts on an ongoing basis. Consider the programmer who oversees software updates, the writer who produces annual reports, or the trainer who supports every change initiative. They may not be full-time, but they are still a vital part of the company, and should be treated accordingly.

While legally, you can’t provide these workers with same benefits or oversight of full-time staff, you can demonstrate to them that they are valued members of your team through competitive incentive programs, effective communication strategies, and the reliability of future work.

As a contingent laborer myself, this is what I (and most of my colleagues) look for in a temporary assignment, and what we are willing to provide in return.

Give them feedback

Like any employee, contingent laborers like to know when they are doing a good job – and when they are screwing up. This can be especially important for remote team members who work in isolation and don’t have the opportunity to ask quick questions, or gauge reaction to their work mid-progress.

Letting them know they are on track, or what they can do to improve, ensures you get the best quality work from them the first time around, and prevents the need for last minute rework requests — which nobody likes. It will also help you build a stronger rapport with your contingent team so they feel comfortable coming to you with questions or requests for feedback as soon as problems arise.

Pay them promptly

Contractor don’t rely on a steady paycheck, but they do rely on being paid promptly by clients based on the agreed-upon terms of their contracts. Whether it’s 30 days, 60 days, or “upon publication,” contractors build their financial planning around expectations that checks will arrive on time. If you delay payments, or your contractors have to fight with your accounting department over every invoice, they will be less productive on current projects, and unwilling to work with you in the future.

Alert them to future work

Subject matter experts can be a hot commodity in today’s market, and their contingent status means they will go wherever the work takes them. If you want to be sure that your expert is available for your next critical project, give them a heads-up.

Contingent workers like to be able to plan their year as far in advance as possible. Letting them know you will have an assignment for them six months down the line, or confirming that you will have a certain amount of work for them every month or quarter gives them stability, which can be a valuable commodity when you aren’t sure where your next project will come from. It can help you win their loyalty, and ensure you have the assets in place to get your project done when the time comes.

Give teams a chance to coalesce

Whether you are assembling a group of all contingent workers, or bringing a few temporary experts onto an existing team, they need time to develop relationships and protocols for getting work done. On IT projects in particular, teams don’t achieve full productivity until they have had a few weeks to get to know each other, to understand each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and to develop a working rhythm.

To streamline this process, introduce teams during the planning stage of a project, create opportunities for them to meet face-to-face, and encourage them to establish processes for working together. You can also improve the ramp-up time by using the same combination of contingent and permanent workers on future projects. This allows them to sidestep the ‘getting to know you’ process, and ensures you have a team of experts who already understand your culture, expectations and reporting requirements.

Pay their rates

Many contingent workers can command high rates because they bring hard-to-find expertise to a project while allowing their clients to avoid the risks and ancillary costs that come with full-time employees. These contingent workers don’t get benefits, or paid time off, or technology allowances. And you are not obligated to employ them for one day longer than their contract stipulates. That is a valuable scenario for companies that want to maintain a level of agility while keeping overhead costs down.

So don’t nickel and dime them. If you want quality outputs and the benefit of temporary expertise, you have to be willing to pay for that privilege. Expertise comes at a price, and if you insist on low-balling your people, you will likely end up with ‘experts’ who have less experience and less ability to deliver the value you want in the time frame you need. You get what you pay for with contingent labor, so factor that into your projected costs.

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Wise Up to Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/wise-emotional-intelligence-workplace/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/wise-emotional-intelligence-workplace/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:00:36 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10346 As employers we hold a certain amount of power. I don’t just mean writing the checks and providing financial stability; I mean employers and company leaders can affect each employee’s day-to-day quality of life. Whether leaders aren’t aware, or they’ve …Read More

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As employers we hold a certain amount of power. I don’t just mean writing the checks and providing financial stability; I mean employers and company leaders can affect each employee’s day-to-day quality of life. Whether leaders aren’t aware, or they’ve simply forgotten in the monotony of it all, their attitude, communication and leadership styles can all have a big impact on the overall happiness of their workforce.

Very recently, we collectively lost a childhood friend and mentor, comedian and actor Robin Williams. Since the loss, I’ve seen a lot of friends urging one another to keep in mind the silent emotional struggles of those around us. This isn’t the first time we’ve had such a tragic and harsh wake-up call, and sadly, it won’t be the last. So what can be done besides a thoughtfully crafted Facebook post?

Be aware of your own influence

As leaders, we often forget the influence that we can have on a day, a career, a life. The average full-time, US worker spends about 1,700 hours per year at work. It truly is up to company leaders how each of those 1,700 hours are spent.

I have personally had a few bosses who would come into work like an emotional tornado. You were either going to have a great, uplifting and fun shift, or you were going to grow more bitter with each passing minute that you will never get back, and it would all depend on what mood the boss was in.

“Employees have a positive relationship with supervisors who care. Just one-third of respondents believe their manager cares about their personal lives, but 54% of these are engaged. Among the two-thirds who do not believe this, only 17% are engaged. There is a dramatic opportunity to boost engagement by managers demonstrating a caring attitude to staff.”

Dale Carnegie, The Role of the Immediate Supervisor

Some workplace management experts contend that having high levels of EI (Emotional Intelligence) is actually more important in leadership than having a high IQ. Wake up to the power of your own influence, learn your own triggers, and make an honest commitment to forging positive relationships with your workforce.

Get in-tune with your workforce

Beyond getting in touch with one’s own emotions and triggers, the other side of emotional intelligence is the ability to monitor other people’s emotions; the skill to discriminate between different emotions, label them appropriately, and to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior.

Emotional intelligence allows leaders to understand the emotions, triggers and feelings of those around them. This understanding helps them to manage relationships and situations more effectively. These leaders are responsive, rather than reactive. Leaders with high levels of emotional intelligence are more often successful in their roles. Caroline Smith of MindTools explains why:

“…Because they’re the ones that others want on their team. When people with high EI send an email, it gets answered. When they need help, they get it. Because they make others feel good, they go through life much more easily than people who are easily angered or upset.”

Forbes business advice contributor, Steve Cooper reported on an international study of over 500 senior execs that revealed that emotional intelligence was a better predictor of success than either relevant previous experience or even a high IQ.

“Leaders are so focused on remaining relevant for their own personal gain that they have forgotten to be more sensitive about how to best serve their employees (the people who help give them relevancy)…Beyond the traditional leadership roles and responsibilities, today’s workplace uncertainty requires leaders to be much more sensitive about what matters most to their employees.”

Glen Llopis, Workplace Leadership and Innovation Expert

There are assessments, courses and entire training programs dedicated to emotional intelligence in the workforce. I’m all for training and tools, but right now might be a better time to simply reflect on how we impact those around us at work, and what we can do to make each interaction just a little more genuine, and respectful.

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Are Counteroffers Hurting Your Business? http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/counteroffers-hurting-business/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/counteroffers-hurting-business/#comments Thu, 21 May 2015 16:00:51 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10343 Is your small business is working hard to hold onto talented employees? If so, you may not be happy to hear about a recent survey, in which 20 percent of executives report the number of counteroffers their companies have made …Read More

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Is your small business is working hard to hold onto talented employees? If so, you may not be happy to hear about a recent survey, in which 20 percent of executives report the number of counteroffers their companies have made to employees who get job offers has risen in the past six months.

Why the trend? Nearly 40 percent of those surveyed make counteroffers in order to retain employees with skills that are hard to find, while 27 percent say it’s to keep long-term employees (and their valuable institutional knowledge) on the team.

What do counteroffers mean for your business?

The good: When your employees feel like they have more job options, they become more confident, which often makes them more energetic and willing to take on new challenges. This can be beneficial for your business if you take advantage of employees’ increased desire to expand their skills. Talk to your team about where they see themselves in one, three or even five years, and develop plans to make that happen internally so they don’t need to look outside the company for opportunity.

The bad: Unless you’re willing to make counteroffers, you may risk losing valuable employees to the competition. Before making a counteroffer, however, consider whether you’re willing to make a counteroffer to every employee who leaves. After all, if Employee A gets a counteroffer and stays with you because of it, word will get out. If Employee B doesn’t get a counteroffer, that news will spread, too—and lead to accusations of favoritism and poor morale.

The ugly: If you start making counteroffers because you truly want to keep a valued employee, less scrupulous employees may start using outside job offers as a way to get counteroffers and jack up their salaries. Plus, there’s always the chance that the employee will use your counteroffer as leverage to get a higher salary offer from the competitor, then leave anyway. Do you really want to take that risk?

If counteroffers are common in your industry, you may have to make them. If so, develop a counteroffer policy that specifies things such as maximum percentage of wages a counteroffer can be, in what situations you would and wouldn’t make a counteroffer, and any other factors you need to consider.

If you don’t want to counteroffer, don’t. You’ll have lots of company: Nearly 40 percent of the companies surveyed make it a policy not to.

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The Top 10 Things Recruiters Must Have with Them http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/the-top-10-things-recruiters-must-have-with-them-at-all-times/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/the-top-10-things-recruiters-must-have-with-them-at-all-times/#comments Wed, 20 May 2015 16:00:38 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11455 The following article originally appeared on Bond. I love hitting the road in my RV. I like being able to stop when I want to enjoy the view at a scenic overlook or just sit and talk around a camp fire …Read More

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The following article originally appeared on Bond.

I love hitting the road in my RV. I like being able to stop when I want to enjoy the view at a scenic overlook or just sit and talk around a camp fire at night. However, the time I forgot to fill the LP tank and so didn’t have heat on a 20-degree night? Not a trip highlight.

We’ve all forgotten something on a trip – whether it was a passport, sunscreen or cell phone charger. Similarly, in recruiting, there are also essential items we can’t forget to pack. Here are the top 10 “must have” things that recruiters must have traveling the road to recruiting.

1. Candidate knowledge. Prior to meeting with a candidate, recruiters must have background knowledge about him or her. At minimum, do a quick preview via a search on LinkedIn and Twitter. In addition to obtaining knowledge about professional skillsets, learn about their life interests so you can connect on a personal level. It also helps you know what candidates look like, so if you’re meeting in a public location such as a coffee shop, you can greet them with confidence.

2. Company background. Recruiters must always pack with them client insight as they pinpoint talent. The interview is a two-way street, says Lisa Holden. “The candidate is determining whether or not you, the work environment and company are a fit. Recruiters are often responsible for a company’s first impression so make sure it’s a good one! Check out the company you’re recruiting for on Glassdoor so you know what points candidates are likely to ask about and prepare answers that align with the company’s brand.”

3. Job descriptions. Always have open jobs’ details and descriptions with you. Look at your recruiting software and any notes you might have about the company culture and background. Ask the candidate questions customized for that job to gain better clarity into that “just right” fit during the interview.

4. Ability to listen. Recruiters must remember to pack the ability to listen. Katrina Collier says listening is about more than tuning in to what is said out loud. “A great recruiter knows how to find out what’s not being said. I always joke about the 2 ears: 1 mouth ratio but it’s so incredibly true.”

5. Communication skills. Be able to explain clearly the benefits of the company, the specific requirements of the job opening and what skills the candidate needs to have. Suzy Tonini says that clarity is crucial in an interview. “Explain to me what [the] company does as if I’ve never heard of it.”

6. Niche knowledge. One thing that recruiters must have at all times is niche industry insight. Niche knowledge helps you to better connect with talent because you know their world, language and trends in that industry. It also helps you improve recruiting efforts, since you know which companies are expanding or downsizing. For example, if a company’s losing money, people who work there are more likely to talk to you about career moves.

7. Culture sense. Knowledge of a client’s corporate culture is key to pack at all times, says Jessica Merrell. Ask the candidate questions to see how she’ll fit within the company’s culture and work environment. “It doesn’t matter how great a candidate looks on paper. He or she must be able to work with the team.”

8. Responsiveness. Scott Wintrip says that the most important thing a recruiter can have is speed. “[Be] the most responsive provider who provides quality talent on demand. Achieving this requires better focus, improved execution, and a nimble response.” 

9. Mobile access. Recruiters should always have mobile access to their staffing software via smartphone or laptop. You need to be able to respond to passive talent when they’re ready to change careers or email resumes when you’re assigned a new job order. 

10. Assurance of follow-up. Mike Lejeune says that recruiters must stay organized and systematic about communicating with candidates after the interview is over as well. “I need to develop the ability to be able to reach out to candidates in a number of ways – verbally, writing, electronically corresponding – about the role you play.”

You’re packed and ready, fully equipped with a packing list of 10 things to have so you don’t get burned. Now it’s time to hit the road.

Read recruiting tips that include Bond’s survey results of recruiters in the whitepaper, “Topping the Charts: What Your Peers Say About How to Fill More Orders Faster in Today’s Recruiting Industry.”

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How Dutch Employers Can Use Glassdoor http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/netherlands/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/netherlands/#comments Wed, 20 May 2015 00:01:08 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11448 Glassdoor is proud to announce the debut of its free Dutch language site, iOS app and Android app. Many Dutch job seekers and employees have already caught on to the value of Glassdoor – there are more than 11,000 company reviews, salary …Read More

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Glassdoor is proud to announce the debut of its free Dutch language site, iOS app and Android app. Many Dutch job seekers and employees have already caught on to the value of Glassdoor – there are more than 11,000 company reviews, salary reports, workplace photos and more for 3,000 Netherlands employers – so what can employers in the Netherlands do to get involved in these very active conversations about their companies?

Below we highlight just a few of the resources available to Dutch employers:

1. Provide feedback and monitor job seeker engagement with a Free Employer Account

With a Free Employer Account, employers gain key benefits to start shaping their employer brands and managing their reputations on Glassdoor. First, the employer account gives organizations the ability to update a basic profile where official company representatives can add a company description, office photos and details about company benefits. Note, 90% of job seekers find the employer perspective useful when learning about jobs and companies. Other benefits of a Free Employer Account include the opportunity to respond to reviews, and access to analytics showing job seeker activity as well as employee sentiment for your company and competitors.

2. Show you are an employer committed to workplace transparency.

Glassdoor’s OpenCompany program recognizes companies that embrace transparency in the workplace. This 5-step process is designed to help job seekers see a clearer picture of what it is like to work at a particular company. As an OpenCompany, the employer will receive a distinct profile badge signaling to job seekers their achievement and commitment to transparency. Learn more about OpenCompany and how to earn this achievement for your company.

3. Have offices in more than one country? Build an Enhanced Profile in each country where you are trying to recruit.

Today’s news follows on the heels of our recent localized profiles announcement that gives multinational employers the opportunities to reach candidates in several North American and European countries where they are trying to recruit. For example, Deloitte and L’Oreal are localizing their Glassdoor Enhanced Profiles in the U.S. and parts of Europe.

With Enhanced Profiles, Glassdoor employers can tell their employer branding stories and differentiate in each market where they are trying to recruit. These profiles also include targeted job advertising and the opportunity to target competitor profiles.

As of May 2015, Glassdoor is now available in eight countries (U.S., Canada, England, Germany, France, Netherlands, Australia and India) and is available in four languages (English, French, Germany and Dutch).

For more updates on Glassdoor Netherlands, follow us at @GlassdoorNL And if you’re interested in finding out how Glassdoor helps employers increase brand awareness, hire high quality candidates, and recruit employees at 30% lower cost per hire than other job sites, read some recent client success stories on Glassdoor for Employers.

Are you a Dutch employer and have questions about Glassdoor? Post a comment below and let us know.

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Hiring Manager vs. Recruiter Relationships: Mind the Gap http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/hiring-manager-vs-recruiter-relationships-mind-the-gap/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/hiring-manager-vs-recruiter-relationships-mind-the-gap/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 16:00:05 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11439 Your business’ success depends on hiring the right candidates. As a hiring manager, the better aligned you are with your partner in recruiting, the more efficient and effective the process will be. A strong partnership is built on communication – …Read More

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Your business’ success depends on hiring the right candidates. As a hiring manager, the better aligned you are with your partner in recruiting, the more efficient and effective the process will be.

A strong partnership is built on communication – whether it’s through face-to-face meetings, phone calls, emails, text messages or instant messages – never stop communicating!

Here are five steps of the hiring process and tips on how to strengthen the recruiter/hiring manager relationship:

1. Intake

Good communication starts at the very beginning of the recruiting process – this stage is the “intake”. If you’re a recruiter, you know exactly what I’m talking about. This initial meeting kicks off the recruiting process. It involves setting expectations for the search by briefing recruiters on their business, highlighting qualifications of the role, setting a timeline and laying out your overall recruiting strategy.

At times, you may even be able to review résumés or candidate profiles and provide feedback on the spot. The information communicated in the intake stage gives recruiters a place to start by narrowing the search specifications. It also helps the recruiter establish credibility with candidates, which increases the likelihood of engaging top talent.

Pro Tip: Never skip an intake session – this can send your recruiter on a wild goose chase. This will ultimately waste your time, the recruiter’s time and the candidate’s time.

2. Sell

Recruiting should be treated as a top priority with the same dedication as any other business project. Your business doesn’t exist without your people. As a hiring manager, approach recruiting as an essential part of your job. Communicate to everyone on your team, at the company, in your network about your hiring needs: think of recruiting as a business opportunity.

Every interaction with a candidate is a chance to sell your company, whether you hire the candidate or not. In this step, act like a salesperson: never stop selling. A candidate might have referrals or may even turn out to be a client down the road. The best teams are formed by the managers that can sell the company and opportunity at hand. Be one of those hiring managers!

3. Give

Another important component of the recruiting process is giving feedback to your recruiter.

As a hiring manager, it’s up to you to refine the candidate search and improve the recruiting process by communicating along the way. A great way to do this is to debrief after every interview. This feedback can be in whatever form of communication you prefer (phone, Skype, in person) – as long as it actually happens.

If feedback is delayed or non-existent, it can be extremely counterproductive – postponing interview scheduling, hiring decisions and ultimately on-boarding new hires. Never stop giving feedback!

4. Get Feedback

Feedback goes both ways. Receiving feedback from your recruiter can be just as effective as providing it. I encourage hiring managers to include recruiters in the interview process whenever they can – this can be a learning experience for both parties. It’s helpful to debrief after each interview, as well. There is always room for improvement.

It’s also crucial for hiring managers to be receptive to recruiter’s feedback, not only for their own growth, but also to be aware of market challenges, applicant expectations and your competitors. Hiring top talent can be an uphill battle – your recruiter’s job is to be the first to hear about what other companies are doing to attract talent, including compensation plans, employee perks, company culture, etc. Be open, listen and learn – this step will give you a key competitive advantage.

5. Communicate

Lastly, communication will make or break the recruiter/hiring manager relationship. Today, I emphasize the importance of constant communication between not only the hiring manager and recruiter, but also with the candidate.

Setting clear expectations, providing prompt feedback, negotiations, offers and onboarding all require constant communication. Hiring managers and recruiters should discuss shared responsibilities in the “intake” stage so that the candidate is well informed. Whether you hire the candidate or not, it doesn’t matter. As companies like Glassdoor continue to inspire transparency in the workplace, a negative candidate experience can have a detrimental affect on your employer brand. Never stop communicating in order to ensure a positive candidate experience and strong employer brand!

If you don’t take recruiting seriously, no one will. We are all working towards the same goal of finding the best talent as quickly and cost effectively as possible! Embrace the relationship you have with your recruiter and never stop communicating.

Be sure to check out our blog post 5 Hiring Mistakes You Should Never Make to learn more about managing the recruiter/hiring manager relationship.

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5 Tips to Motivate Brand Ambassadors http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-tips-to-motivate-brand-ambassadors/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-tips-to-motivate-brand-ambassadors/#comments Fri, 15 May 2015 16:00:01 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11431 Your employees are your brand: it’s as simple as that. You’ve likely heard this message time and time again, but are you doing anything about it? Whether you like it or not, your employees have lives outside work and are …Read More

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Your employees are your brand: it’s as simple as that. You’ve likely heard this message time and time again, but are you doing anything about it?

Whether you like it or not, your employees have lives outside work and are walking, talking representations of your brand. They’re leaving reviews on Glassdoor, chatting to friends over brunch and happy hour about work, and attending events on your company’s behalf. So, take advantage of these moments and build brand ambassadors.

What is a brand ambassador?

“Brand ambassador” has become quite the buzzword – but what does it mean? According to Forbes, brand ambassadors are “employees who are thoroughly engaged, connected and committed.”

Part of building brand ambassadors has to do with how connected your employees feel to your organization. If your employees understand their role in helping your company succeed and feel inspired to help build your brand, your overall recruiting and branding efforts will profit.

Taking the plunge: creating brand ambassadors

It can be daunting to build an internal army of brand ambassadors. But, engaging your employees and encouraging them to champion your brand will save you money in the long run. Increasing employee engagement investments by 10% can increase profits by $2,400 per employee, per year, according to the Workplace Research Foundation.

So, now you know how crucial it is to build brand ambassadors, but how do you actually go about it? Here are five quick tips to inspire your employees to become brand ambassadors:

1. Encourage them.

Just as your sales org needs a vote of confidence at the end of a tough quarter, your employees need encouragement to stay motivated and champion your brand. Companies that foster brand ambassadors see a 67% increase in employees who actively advocate for their company (Workplace Research Foundation).

Let your employees know how much you value their help and encourage them to be their true selves both at work and at home. Building brand ambassadors won’t be successful if you force your employees to fit a certain mold or tell only one side of the story – employees need to tell the honest truth about why they love their jobs and what could improve.

To do this, host training sessions and encourage your employees to spread your company’s mission through their social media networks and to their friends and family. This sense of community will motivate them to help out!

2. Communicate the importance.

Once you encourage your employees to represent your company, communicate why you need them to advocate for your brand. Let them know the percentage of your company’s hires that come through employee referrals – this will help them understand how referrals impact your entire business. If your employees understand the importance and influence of brand ambassadors, they will be more willing to aid you. This will also lead to more employees helping with the workload.

3. Incentivize them.

While many employees may be happy to help you out solely for the good of the brand, others may need extra incentive to promote your brand.

At Glassdoor, our employee referral bonus program pays employees a lump sum after 90 days if a referral of theirs works out and lands a position. While many of our employees are happy to help anyway, a financial gain can be the push some need to get on board.

Note: this doesn’t have to be expensive! Build your programs around what you can afford. Even if all you can offer is swag, employees will appreciate the thought. Additionally, internal contests are a great (and free!) way to bring employees together and recognize individual winners or teams.

4. Train them.

If you’re hesitant to let your employees speak, tweet and post on your behalf, train them! Host company training sessions about social media best practices and how employees can best spread the company message.

At Glassdoor, we host a social media 101 training where we detail what employees can and can’t share on social media and directions for auto-sharing new job openings to their social networks. This helps employees understand their part in the recruiting and branding big picture.

5. Make it easy.

Remember, your employees are busy doing their jobs. They probably won’t help out if it means a big time commitment. So, make things easy to understand, host training sessions and have a point person who can answer questions. The simpler you make it for employees to lend a hand, the better your chances of earning their help.

Why brand ambassadors matter

Ultimately, brand ambassadors are the backbone of any solid employer brand. Enlist your employees to boost your recruiting and branding efforts! For more information, check our eBook, 5 Employee Engagement Strategies from Glassdoor Best Places to Work Winners.

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