Glassdoor for Employers http://employers.glassdoor.com Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:00:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Who Needs to Be Involved in Your Hiring Process? http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/who-needs-to-be-involved-in-your-hiring-process/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/who-needs-to-be-involved-in-your-hiring-process/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:00:16 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11713 The worst business mistake you can make is hiring the wrong person, right? This makes a recruiter’s job not just pressure-packed but truly daunting. My advice? Don’t go at it alone! To build and live the ideal hiring and the …Read More

The post Who Needs to Be Involved in Your Hiring Process? appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
The worst business mistake you can make is hiring the wrong person, right? This makes a recruiter’s job not just pressure-packed but truly daunting. My advice? Don’t go at it alone!

To build and live the ideal hiring and the interview process, involve four to six people: recruiter, hiring manager, team members and your boss. Even if you’ve never formally assembled an interviewing team, for example, I think it’s worth your effort. You’ll set yourself up for success while minimizing your stress.

Before we dive in, a word of caution: I understand everyone’s team dynamic is unique. So feel free to tailor my advice for your own team. Above all, keep things simple, and you’ll succeed.

The recruiter

First and foremost, recruiters should always be involved in the hiring process, every step of the way. In most cases, the first interaction a candidate has with your company is with a recruiter. If you have a solid, engaging recruiting team, you can expect this initial touch to be a positive one. Recruiters also play a critical role in managing the candidate experience, including pre-screening, scheduling, making offers and turning down candidates.

Meanwhile, internally, I’ve learned one key to a strong relationship with your recruiting team is constant communication. Ask for follow-up and status update emails as much as possible. Lean on your team start to finish to ensure a positive, consistent and ultimately successful hiring process!

The hiring manager

The hiring manager is arguably the most important person involved in the hiring process. When you’re hiring for your team, you need to be a key player and the ultimate decision maker. While you can (and should) delegate responsibilities during the process, hiring is not one of them.

Personally, I encourage all hiring managers to screen candidates (either via phone or in person) following the recruiter’s pre-screening to determine if the candidate should move forward in the process. At this point, the recruiter should have general information such as candidate experience level, availability, interest level, salary expectations and interview notes. It’s now the hiring manager’s job to dig deeper and really determine if this candidate would be a good fit for the organization and your team. Hiring can either make or break your business – do it right!

The team

At Glassdoor, teammates are always involved in the hiring process. The teammates you include in interviews and hiring decisions should be top performers and either already in a leadership position or demonstrate potential for leadership.

Furthermore, involve team members whom you trust (like your right-hand or No. 1), who reflect your company culture and who show real dedication to the business. Task the team with assessing a culture fit and providing a great candidate experience. By this point in the process, you should feel fairly optimistic about your short-list of candidates.

Your boss

No matter how much autonomy you have, as a final safety check, solicit the opinion of a senior colleague, e.g., your boss! Even a brief phone call or 1:1 interview can help ensure there are no red flags or glaring weaknesses everyone else might have missed. Keep in mind, however, that it may be inappropriate (or impossible, based on busy schedules) for your boss to be involved in every step of the hiring process. You may need to be content that she sit in on the final candidate presentation.

Finally, now that you know who the key players should be in the hiring process, I’d like you to take a step back and review your overall interviewing experience from the candidate perspective. A good place to start is monitoring your interview feedback on Glassdoor to see what candidates like and dislike about your current process. I promise you, this feedback can be a real eye-opener. But whether it’s critical, positive or somewhere in-between, consider it free, actionable advice your entire recruiting team can profit from.

The post Who Needs to Be Involved in Your Hiring Process? appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/who-needs-to-be-involved-in-your-hiring-process/feed/ 0
Reference Questions that Work! http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/reference-questions-that-work/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/reference-questions-that-work/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 16:00:32 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11709 I am heartbroken. Anna McCarthy has gone off to college. My life has just taken a turn and I feel it may not be for the better. Let me explain. I have known Anna since she was five years old …Read More

The post Reference Questions that Work! appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
I am heartbroken. Anna McCarthy has gone off to college. My life has just taken a turn and I feel it may not be for the better.

Let me explain. I have known Anna since she was five years old when her family moved onto our street.

I met her on Halloween when she came to my door trick or treating. I opened the door to this little girl with big brown eyes and a smile as wide as the plastic pumpkin she was holding. With a blue lab coat, cotton “OR” type cap and stethoscope around her neck, I exclaimed, “Ah, I see you’re a doctor!” “No,” she replied quickly, “I am a veterinarian.”

Anna’s love of all animals, especially dogs and horses, was apparent from that moment on. Over the years she would become our dog walker, dog sitter, house sitter and finally, my “sous gardener.” (Anna’s gardening skills surpass my own.) Our dogs, our yard and our lives were never happier than when Anna was around.

But that’s all over and I am left with a page full of names of possible replacements for Anna, provided by various neighbors and friends. I have started talking to some candidates and now find myself in the reference stage of the process. But, needless to say, vendors, like candidates, provide you with references they know will be positive. So, is there really any point in making these calls? Yes!

It’s much the same when hiring a new employee. References tend to be real supporters of the candidate and probably won’t say anything negative. So, how can you get valuable information about your potential employee? It’s real simple.

There are just TWO rules you have to remember when checking references:

  1. Talk to the Right People
  2. Ask the Right Questions

Talk to the right people

Make sure that your final candidates give you the kind of references that you need. Be specific about who you must speak with. Here’s what I request from candidates as a reference:

  • Two former bosses or managers. Be sure you speak with someone who, like yourself, has managed your candidate. They will be a good guide to how the candidate responds to motivation, work ethic, etc. (More about that later).
  • A customer. This is especially important when hiring a salesperson. You want to see how your candidate comes across to prospects and customers. Top salespeople will be happy to give you a customer reference. They are proud of their accomplishments and many times these relationships last long after the sale is made.
  • A peer. This is not as important as the manager or customer, but a peer can give valuable insight as to how your potential employee works in a team environment. And, even though you may be hiring an individual contributor who may be in a remote office, remember that she has to fit in with the rest of your team. This type of reference is especially important when you are hiring in a marketing department, for example, where one person’s work directly correlates to another’s and meeting deadlines may depend on close cooperation.

If a candidate cannot give you three business references (especially a candidate who has been working for more than five years), you have reason to be suspicious. And, as a rule, I accept no personal references.

Ask the right questions

Years ago (longer than I care to admit!) when I started my sales career, one of my best managers told me, “Ask the right questions and you’ll get the right answers.” This is not only true in selling; this is true in checking references as well. When I am called for a reference, I am always amazed at either how general the questions are (e.g., “So, how was Mary to manage?”) or how irrelevant they are (e.g., “Did you enjoy working with Mary?”). I wish I was kidding about these. Bad questions will get you bad answers.

First, be sure to take the important step of establishing rapport with your reference to make him feel comfortable about sharing information with you. Reassure the reference that your conversation is in the strictest of confidence as well.

Then, be more specific in your questions. Ask questions like:

  • How long have you known the candidate?
  • Were you involved in the hiring process or did you directly hire the candidate?
  • Did the candidate report to you directly or dotted line? Please describe your relationship with the candidate.
  • Did the candidate consistently hit or miss goals/quotas?
  • Would you say the candidate made a substantial, average, or below average contribution to the organization? Please describe the reasons for your answer.
  • How well did the candidate perform under stressful conditions such as facing sales or project deadlines?
  • How well did the candidate deal with any organizational or management changes that took place or any customer sales or service issues?
  • Were there any areas where the candidate excelled? Any particular strengths? Please be specific.
  • Conversely, are there any areas that the candidate could use improvement? Any particular weaknesses? Please be specific.

Remember, too, that keeping your reference check in a conversational manner will boost the quality of information shared. Good luck!

The post Reference Questions that Work! appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/reference-questions-that-work/feed/ 0
Rockstar Recruiter Series: Kareo http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-recruiter-series-kareo/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-recruiter-series-kareo/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:00:46 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11647 I’m impressed when a candidate: Follows up with me on LinkedIn with a personal message after they have applied. At the very least I take a moment to review their candidacy to see if I have anything that may be …Read More

The post Rockstar Recruiter Series: Kareo appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
I’m impressed when a candidate:

Follows up with me on LinkedIn with a personal message after they have applied. At the very least I take a moment to review their candidacy to see if I have anything that may be a fit for their skills. Less than 1% of applicants do this and it really makes them stand out to me. I am also very impressed with a candidate who does their Kareo homework and has good questions about our product and understands the value it brings the healthcare community.

I’m impressed when a recruiter:

Sends a personalized emails on LinkedIn. Most recruiters will “spray and pray”. It speaks volumes when in-mails are tailored to the individual, perhaps noting a mutual contact or referencing a particular accomplishment. If more recruiters took a minute to try and make a genuine connection they would be able to build a pipeline that would serve them for future placements.

I have been in the recruiting industry:

25 years. I started out in Recruiting, shifted to Human Resources and have come back to Recruiting. I call it the happy place – I never got flowers for keeping the company from a sexual harassment lawsuit, but have received several tokens for appreciation from both candidates and hiring manager for changing their lives for the better.

I know I’ve done a great job hiring when:

The candidate brings me referrals, the hiring manager sends flowers, my boss high-fives me and it brings joy to my day. I get a great deal of satisfaction from putting the right person in the right job. I also know I am doing a great job because I love coming to work at Kareo. I get a lot of support from the people here and the hiring managers are the best I have ever worked with. So if I do a great job hiring, it is because of the team. It is a collaborative efforts and we play off each other’s expertise. They manage the on the job experience and I manage the candidate experience – by the time the offer comes around the candidate is so excited to come to work for Kareo. That is ultimately when I know I have done a good job.

The biggest challenge recruiting candidates today is:

Finding the purple squirrel when they don’t want to be found. This is also the best part of my job. Awesome candidates are busy making an impact where they currently work and finding a way to connect with them can be challenging. But when they respond and want to have a chat and “hear a little more” I have accomplished something big.

I stay cutting edgy by:

Providing an amazing candidate experience. It sounds simple and it isn’t “cutting edge technology”, but it is surprising how many recruiters/companies do not put an emphasis on the candidate experience. When a candidate is on the receiving end of this high level, professional level of service, it feels cutting edge and creates a positive experience.

I’ll invest more efforts in:

Proactively reaching out to candidates to create a pipeline, giving back and paying it forward. I am often asked what is my “secret sauce”? I call it karma recruiting – do nice things for others/candidates and good candidates will find me. So far, this has been a great blueprint for success.

Executives see employer branding and recruiting as:

A complimentary union. If one is great, the other will follow and visa versa. I feel like Kareo accomplishes this in a huge way! Twenty-five percent of my jobs are filled with people who apply to our jobs and these candidates are exceptional. I couldn’t do it without our amazing branding and award winning culture.

I use Glassdoor because:

I find more relevant information for the hiring landscape than I do anywhere else. I also use it to get a better understanding of the candidate’s perspective as well. If I understand the knowledge they are working with it is much easier to relate and make a connection.

My success is most closely tied to:

My network, my integrity and LinkedIn. I have been working in Orange County for the past 20 years and have developed a deep network of professionals. LinkedIn is the tool that holds that network together.

I could improve my reputation as a recruiter if I did this:

Blogged, wrote articles and participated in particular industry boards. These are the things I always think about doing, and I sure do have a lot of opinions about a lot of things and some would call me passionate, but I always seem to find the time to do other things instead of write.

The post Rockstar Recruiter Series: Kareo appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-recruiter-series-kareo/feed/ 0
5 Ways to Prevent Counteroffer Acceptance http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-ways-to-prevent-counteroffer-acceptance/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-ways-to-prevent-counteroffer-acceptance/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:00:46 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11700 I scan the Wall Street Journal every day before heading off to work. But there are times I think I should just cancel my print subscription and read archived editions online because the news doesn’t really seem to change much …Read More

The post 5 Ways to Prevent Counteroffer Acceptance appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
I scan the Wall Street Journal every day before heading off to work. But there are times I think I should just cancel my print subscription and read archived editions online because the news doesn’t really seem to change much – especially when it’s bad. Here’s what I mean:

  • The people we thought were our enemies are now our allies.
  • The people we thought were our allies are now our enemies.
  • Stocks are going up, my 401K looks better, but some analysts say there’s a “correction” coming. Do I pull out or ride it out?
  • Unemployment is finally coming down but wages are stagnant and real incomes haven’t risen in years. Is that why I feel like I’m not making progress?
  • Job creation in technology is at an all-time high (especially on the left coast) yet memories of the “dot com bust” are fresh and analogies are being made. How secure is my job, anyway?
  • I’ve read we’ve been in this “recovery/recession” so long that it’s time for the next recession!
  • How many countries are in NATO again?
  • The guy sitting next to me on the plane is blowing his nose like crazy. Will I get his cold, or even worse, has he been to Liberia lately?
  • Do I really need a flu shot?

You can be certain there’s uncertainty

You get the point. There’s lots of uncertainty about small and big things that are happening – globally and locally. And this is causing the “FUD Factor” to loom large. FUD stands for fear, uncertainty and doubt. While the term originates from old computer pricing strategies, FUD has come to be associated with any situation where fear, uncertainty and doubt play a real factor. And that fits today’s job market, and especially counteroffers, to a tee.

That’s why, more than ever, people are accepting counteroffers from their current employers when they attempt to resign. The confusion about large economic and political factors causes a lack of confidence that things are heading in the right direction. When that happens, the “devil that you know” reasoning takes hold and people accept a counteroffer, staying put in jobs they may truly dislike!

An ounce of prevention

The best way to insure that your candidate says no to the counteroffer is to incorporate the following five steps during every interview process:

1. Determine their motivation. There’s a reason why your candidate answered your ad or your recruiter’s call. If they are gainfully employed, there’s something they are not happy about in their current situation. Get to the bottom of that. I actually ask, “Tell me, what’s not happening at your current company that would cause you to look for another job?” Then, sit back and listen for the answer. Their answer may be critical information if you are faced with a counteroffer. The motivation behind their decision to leave a company doesn’t change if they decide to stay. Make that argument to them during the interview process.

2. Sell your company. It’s amazing how many companies don’t proactively “sell” themselves during the interview process. (As a matter of fact, some companies feel it’s not inherent upon them to sell their opportunity, but rather it is the candidate who should be selling hard! Think again – especially in this market.) Tell your candidate what a stellar engineering team you have, how much opportunity the market holds, what a wonderful culture you have, etc. List all of the “sizzlers” about your company and the position. Then be sure to incorporate all of those elements into your interview.

3. Make your offer up close and personal. People like to be told they are wanted. And, the best place to do that is with them in the room. Make your offer in person, if you can. Tell your candidates how excited you are about the possibility of them joining the company, reiterate your growth plans for them and remind them of the contribution they can make. Then present the offer and review any details.

4. Remember that time kills deals. Have an expiration date on your offer. I recommend one week, but if it’s been a lengthy interview process and you’re fairly sure your candidate will accept, you can pare that down. An offer presented on a Tuesday can have a Friday expiration date.

5. Stay in touch. The most critical time during the whole process can be the time between the offer acceptance and the start date.  During that time, be sure to stay in close contact with your future employee. If you can, have them meet with people they’ll be working with; take them to lunch; keep them in the loop on important developments of the company. There are lots of things you can do to stay connected with that new employee. Do them!

You can’t change the fact that your candidate may get a counteroffer, especially in this competitive market. But, what you CAN do during the interview process will definitely affect whether they accept a counteroffer.

The post 5 Ways to Prevent Counteroffer Acceptance appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/5-ways-to-prevent-counteroffer-acceptance/feed/ 0
Mobile is the Purple Squirrel Magnet http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/mobile-purple-squirrel-magnet/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/mobile-purple-squirrel-magnet/#comments Sat, 27 Jun 2015 16:00:24 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10316 We’ve all read best practices about attracting top talent; there are about 4,987 blog posts dedicated to finding these coveted few. A recent Jobvite study has highlighted one major element of attraction in their “Job Seeker Nation: Mobility in the …Read More

The post Mobile is the Purple Squirrel Magnet appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
We’ve all read best practices about attracting top talent; there are about 4,987 blog posts dedicated to finding these coveted few. A recent Jobvite study has highlighted one major element of attraction in their “Job Seeker Nation: Mobility in the Workforce Study”.

High mobility workers are defined as the portion of the labor market that has the opportunity and experience to switch jobs more frequently. They are considered the in-demand workers who have advancement opportunities within the labor market. Simply put, these are the folks you probably want working for you. Not to be confused with job-hoppers.

What does the high mobility worker look like?

They make up a surprisingly small portion of the workforce. Here’s the math: 36% of job seekers have a college, or post-graduate degree. Of those job seekers, 80% are full-time employed. To get more detailed, the in-demand fields of these highly mobile job seekers are technology, manufacturing and retail. Again, the people you’re trying to attract.

The magnet part…

Back to how “mobile is the purple squirrel magnet”. This highly mobile sector of the workforce has been proven to prefer the emerging, non-traditional methods in their job searches. In fact, twice as many of them used recruiters or social networks to find their current job. Their social site of choice is LinkedIn, while the majority of low-mobility workers (those in career fields with less advancement opportunities), turn to Facebook for their SoMe job hunt. While 94% of recruiters use LinkedIn to scout out candidates, only 34% of job seekers are – but it looks like it’s the right 36%.

Nearly a quarter (24%) of highly mobile job seekers find the ability to apply for jobs on mobile important, and 21% find an optimized, mobile website to be important during the job search. For some, these might seem like “no-duh” statistics, but a recent LinkedIn study revealed that only 13% of employers are adequately investing in mobile recruiting.

What are they looking for?

Well we know that LinkedIn is their job search social media platform of choice, so who better to look to for the answer?! The same LI study defines exactly what job candidates are looking for when they reach your mobile career site.

  • 94% of candidates want to see current job openings on the mobile career site.
  • 72% of visitors to a mobile career site expect to find a description of the company culture.
  • 61% of candidates want to learn about the company history.
  • 56% of mobile job seekers expect to find benefits information.
  • 45% want to explore profiles of employees.

Aren’t they taken?

Social job seekers are wealthier, more highly educated and more likely to be employed full-time. So in all reality, these sought after, highly mobile workers are spoken for job-wise, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they aren’t willing to consider other opportunities. In fact, the Jobvite Jobseeker National Study revealed that 51% of employed workers are either actively seeking, or open to a new job. For highly mobile jobseekers that number is even higher at 56% and 31% of them change jobs every 1-5 years.

I know that recruiters have preached enough about getting their efforts mobile, but the fact still remains that a mere 13% of employers are adequately investing in mobile recruiting. Yeah, I used that one again, because it’s pretty surprising. As the battle for top talent heats up, employers are going to lose out big on the opportunity to effortlessly get in front of the right audience with mobile career sites and mobile job application platforms. How does your mobile strategy look?

The post Mobile is the Purple Squirrel Magnet appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/mobile-purple-squirrel-magnet/feed/ 0
Talent Branding: What’s In a Name? http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/talent-branding-whats-name/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/talent-branding-whats-name/#comments Fri, 26 Jun 2015 16:00:36 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=10319 That infamous question – What’s in a name? As we tragically found out, a lot. A name can carry thoughts, feelings and ideas that may or may not accurately reflect the subject. For employers, the name of their company holds …Read More

The post Talent Branding: What’s In a Name? appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
That infamous question – What’s in a name? As we tragically found out, a lot. A name can carry thoughts, feelings and ideas that may or may not accurately reflect the subject. For employers, the name of their company holds a lot of weight when it comes to the attraction of quality talent. A name can either deter or entice job seekers to find out more, apply and ultimately invest in the organization with their time, dedication and talents.

How can business owners ensure their organizations don’t meet the same terrible fate as the lovers who asked that loaded question? What’s in a name? Well, first they have to realize just how important their name is to job seekers. The average employer doesn’t have a realistic grasp of the bottom line impact of being an employer of choice, or transversely, being an employer with a bad reputation. So, here are a couple of eye-opening stats from LinkedIn’s masterpiece, “The Employer Brand Handbook”:

  • A strong talent brand reduces cost-per-hire by up to 50%.
  • A strong talent brand can also slash turnover rates by as much as 28%.

Yeah, I snuck in a new term. LinkedIn defines the talent brand as such:

“Your talent brand is the highly social, totally public version of your employer brand that incorporates what talent thinks, feels, and shares about your company as a place to work.”

It’s your reputation, your impact – your name. The talent brand is where the rubber meets the road – where reality and perception meet to uncover actionable improvements to your human capital management and recruiting efforts. Creating and maintaining a talent brand isn’t just about how you would like your audience to view your organization, but infusing that ideal with the current reality of your audience’s opinion. Instead of just pushing out a message (employer branding), talent branding requires a long, hard honest look at the current state of your employee satisfaction and engagement.

Building and maintaining a talent brand

Get back to values

Can the company values be felt, seen or heard anywhere in the office place? Have they even been established and communicated? Probably not. The Boston Research Group surveyed thousands of US workers and found only 3% of those surveyed described their company’s values as a form of “self-governance”. Again, a talent brand is about more than pushing out a message, it’s about how to get buy-in on that message. Conduct an executive overview of the organizational values, and then infuse every square inch of that workspace.

Empower through goals

The issue most leaders have with empowering their employees lies in performance management. Leaders find that the second they loosen the reigns everything rapidly deteriorates. Leaders then quickly learn to never try that again, and become more steadfast in their micromanaging ways, which in turn stifles and devalues employees. There is a better, more strategic approach to empowerment, and it’s goal-centric.

Currently, only about 14% of organizations report their employees have a good understanding of their company’s strategy and direction. No wonder it’s like wrangling an octopus every time leaders take their hands off the controls. Focus on establishing and communicating goals on every rung of the corporate ladder.

Invest in ambassadors

Not everyone is go to buy into your values, not everyone is going to care in the least about your organizational goals, but some will, and those are the people you need to create a cyclically supportive relationship with. It’s not difficult to find out who they are; they are engaged, they put forth discretionary effort and their connection with the organization trickles into their personal lives whether it be through employee referrals, social media support or simply saying “I love my job”, when a friend or stranger asks.

This doesn’t go to say you should ignore your haters, but focusing on your ambassadors is simply the smarter plan of attack. Treat their referrals like gold, acknowledge and reward their extra effort and encourage their internal career development.

The message that your organization is an “awesome place to work” has never cut it, and it never will. Even those workplaces winning awards for employee satisfaction have lost the trust of their audience. Quality talent needs a little more persuading -they need a real life, honest talent brand.

The post Talent Branding: What’s In a Name? appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/talent-branding-whats-name/feed/ 0
Adding Authenticity to Your Career Site http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/adding-authenticity-to-your-career-site/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/adding-authenticity-to-your-career-site/#comments Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:00:20 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11665 Creating consistency across all of your organization’s career platforms is no easy task. But it can greatly enhance and amplify the employer brand you’ve worked so hard to establish and nurture. When a job candidate sees your mission statement and …Read More

The post Adding Authenticity to Your Career Site appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
Creating consistency across all of your organization’s career platforms is no easy task. But it can greatly enhance and amplify the employer brand you’ve worked so hard to establish and nurture.

When a job candidate sees your mission statement and then encounters a company rating or review that backs it up—Click!—you build serious trust between employer and job seeker. No wonder when 78% of job seekers say that ratings and reviews from those on the inside are influential when deciding where to work.

Today, thousands of employers showcase the Glassdoor icon or button on their career site, right alongside all other their social networks. This is a great way to show job seekers that you confidently stand by what your employees say about you.

But what works even better is to pull relevant content (reviews, ratings and testimonials) right onto your career site. Here are four important benefits:

  1. Job seekers can learn about your company’s Glassdoor content without ever leaving your career site.
  2. You maintain control over which content displays—with an assist from Glassdoor content widgets.
  3. You feature authentic content. Anyone can boast, “We’re an awesome place to work!” A better impact is embedding real-world Glassdoor content, provided by current and former employees.
  4. As with the social badge icon, widgets help you qualify for OpenCompany status, which recognizes your company’s commitment to transparency. If you would like assistance integrating a Glassdoor widget or social badge onto your career site, tell your client success manager or contact us.

Speaking of Glassdoor widgets, here are a few of our favorites, available on our website.

  1. Single-review testimonial, which you can create from any review of your company—ideal for placement on your career site.
  2. Overall company rating.
  3. Current featured review.
  4. Glassdoor icon with multiple reviews and testimonials overview.

Meanwhile, here are seven companies that have made their career site more authentic by highlighting Glassdoor reviews and ratings:

  1. SirsiDynix, a support center that houses 23,000 library systems in over 70 countries worldwide and a Glassdoor 2014 Best Places to Work, highlights its 4.2 stat rating, 98% CEO approval, and a review from a Shrumaster in Lehi, UT. (Option #2)
  2. Infinite Direct, which outsources top talent for companies, highlights its 2015 Best Places to Work award, 4.1 rating, 99% CEO approval and Account Executive testimonial, alongside widgets to Twitter and Google+. (Option #2)
  3. Nuance, the market leader in Natural Language Processing & Understanding, features the Glassdoor icon on its career site alongside its social icons, plus its reviews and ratings and what employees have to say about working there. (Option #3)
  4. AstraZeneca, a pharmaceutical company, highlights a 5-star Glassdoor review on its Working Here tab. (Option #2)
  5. TMobile, a leading telecommunications company, links to a single review and testimonial on its Colorado Springs career page. (Option #1)
  6. Kronos, a company that strives to create an environment conducive to spirit and innovation, highlights its reviews and rating on its Working at Kronos page on its career site. (Option #2)
  7. Informatica, a data company in the San Francisco Bay Area, features its ratings and reviews front and center on its career site. (Option #2)

Glassdoor will be rolling out more widgets to help employers pump up their career sites. To stay updated about product enhancements (and industry trends and news), subscribe to the Glassdoor for Employers Blog.

The post Adding Authenticity to Your Career Site appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/adding-authenticity-to-your-career-site/feed/ 0
Why Your Career Site Isn’t Working http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/career-site-isnt-working/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/career-site-isnt-working/#comments Wed, 24 Jun 2015 17:00:35 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=9545 You know the phrase, “It’s not you. It’s me?” Well it may be time to keep this in mind if you find your employer brand has low awareness or you’re not getting the candidate pipeline you hoped. I know, not …Read More

The post Why Your Career Site Isn’t Working appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
You know the phrase, “It’s not you. It’s me?” Well it may be time to keep this in mind if you find your employer brand has low awareness or you’re not getting the candidate pipeline you hoped. I know, not exactly what you wanted to hear.

The good news is that 89% of job seekers say they find the employer perspective important when researching jobs and companies, according to a new survey out from Glassdoor today. The bad news is that your careers site likely doesn’t have all the information they need. So the bottom line is that job seekers want to hear from hiring managers and recruiters, but they want to gain useful information that will help them determine if your company is the right fit.

Careers Sites Don’t Offer Full Details on Culture, Compensation, Benefits & More

As part of our survey, we asked job seekers to indicate the top five most important pieces of information they want to hear from employers. Three in four (76%) said they want details on what makes the company an attractive place to work, 70% said they want details on compensation, 62% said they want details on benefits packages, 60% want to hear the company’s mission, vision and values, and 55% said they want basic company information (i.e. number of employees, revenue, office locations and competitors.)

Ok, now is the time to go pull up your career site and your Glassdoor profile as well. View them side by side. How do they compare? Notice Glassdoor has all the information on your company job seekers indicated they want and more? Job seekers can see direct from you, the employer, a ‘Why Work for Us’ section, read up on which benefits you offer and get key company information. Plus they can see company reviews, salary reports and benefits reviews direct from employees.

Tip: Make it easier to give job seekers what they need by including a link to your Glassdoor profile direct from your careers site. Also claim your free employer account and get an enhanced employer profile so you can get your story out to target candidates.

When updating your brand, think about the information that will work best with your key recruiting audiences and your diversity needs. For example, if you’re looking to recruit more women to your company you may want to emphasize benefits. Glassdoor research shows that more women (76%) than men (66%) want information about benefits. Whereas the top two pieces of information military veterans want to hear about from employers are details on compensation (70%) and an overview of the company’s mission, vision and values (70%).

Careers Sites Are One-Way Communication

While it’s great to get information you need, that same information can really come to life when you feel a sense of engagement. On Glassdoor, a CEO or other company representative can publicly respond to reviews. To understand how meaningful the engagement is to job seekers we asked them. A whopping 69% said that their perception of a company improves when they see an executive or other company representative respond to reviews. What’s the two-way communication like on your careers site?

Tip: To respond to your company reviews on Glassdoor, register for a free employer account. Then simply click the button that says ‘Add Employer Response.’ Also by accessing your employer center, you can respond to reviews within this dashboard and track how your brand awareness is faring over time.

Careers Sites Are Static

When was the last time you updated your career site with more than job listings? We get it. It’s not always easy to make changes on the fly to your company careers site, but guess what? It is easy to update your profile on Glassdoor. We know – you’re shocked this is where we were headed. But there is a reason it matters. The survey shows that 94% of job seekers agree they are likely to apply to a job if an employer actively manages its brand (e.g., sharing details of culture, updating employer profiles and publicly responding to company reviews). Less than 2% said it would not impact their decision to apply and the remaining 4% were unsure.

Tip: With a free employer account, you will receive regular emails with updates about how your profile is performing on Glassdoor and any new reviews or salary reports your company receives. Use these emails as a reminder to check in on your profile and provide any new updates. Updates can be as simple as a new office photo from a recent company event or can be a response to a new company review.

Interested in learning more about the Business Case for Employer Branding? Download the eBook to find out how much you could be saving with a strong employer brand!

 Business-Case-For-Employer-Branding

Also, join us for our webinar, The Business Case for Employer Brandingthis Thursday, June 25th at 11 AM PST to learn more about how to justify investing in your corporate reputation and measure the ROI of your efforts.

The post Why Your Career Site Isn’t Working appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/career-site-isnt-working/feed/ 0
Tips for SMBs to Stand Out on Glassdoor http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/tips-for-smbs-to-stand-out-on-glassdoor/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/tips-for-smbs-to-stand-out-on-glassdoor/#comments Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:00:03 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11641 In recent years, employment branding has become the move. I love seeing countless posts around the topic and the lively discussions at conferences around the world. The message is now out there for companies as to why it’s so important …Read More

The post Tips for SMBs to Stand Out on Glassdoor appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
In recent years, employment branding has become the move. I love seeing countless posts around the topic and the lively discussions at conferences around the world. The message is now out there for companies as to why it’s so important to invest in your employer brand.

The problem: the how

Now, companies know why it’s important, but most have no clue as to how to get started. Even more problematic is that most “case studies” provided only highlight the very large, well-known companies and how they’re spending millions of dollars a year on their employment brand. Think about that for a second: we are trying to spread the gospel of the importance of employer branding, yet we are giving this community a map that contains only companies who have massive teams, enormous budgets and built-in, well-known brands already. How does this help the majority of companies out there who don’t enjoy these resources or advantages?

I work with a lot of clients, some of them large and some less than 60 employees – and everywhere in between. Most often, I hear “We want to be like Google.” Of course, Google has a very exciting and compelling employer brand. But what they’re really saying is, “I don’t want to work this hard to recruit candidates anymore – I want the right candidates to just come to us.” I’m betting most of you reading this would love that, too.

The CloudLock example

CloudLock is a SaaS security company based out of Waltham, MA with about 120 employees. CloudLock was not a customer of Glassdoor when we started working together, and had a desire to hire 50 people in 2015 – no small task as that would be a huge increase of employees from where they were. Throw in the fact that they had no recruiting department, are in a highly competitive space and even more competitive geography – they realized early on that their employer brand was going to be key in getting their message out to prospective candidates.

When CloudLock started this journey, they had 550 views on their Glassdoor profile per month – that’s it. Here’s where we are today:

  • 3,180 views per month – 843% increase, with the arrow is up and to the right every month
  • CloudLock hired 48 people so far, on a plan of 50 people in 2015

Here are five tips and tricks we implemented at CloudLock that you can do, too. Some of these you can carry out with a Glassdoor Free Employer Account, while some you need the paid account. All of them work – and you don’t need to be Google to have success.

1. Images matter. It is not enough to have pictures. I see all too often companies posting pictures of their buildings, trade show booths at events and clearly posed team pictures with everyone in the same company shirt. Think about the message this sends around your employment brand. It is saying that you are like everyone else.

If you look at the more effective Glassdoor pages, the pictures are more often than not organic and fun captures of life at the company. Taking a job is a very emotional process and a hugely important one in people’s lives. Do not underestimate this importance in what you choose to show. At CloudLock, we chose images of life around the office that captures perfectly our very fun and extremely collaborative environment. Extra point – the banner image is critical. Your logo as your banner image? Fail.

2. Video killed the radio star but absolutely helps employment brand. A lot of companies are afraid of video for employment branding or they choose to create those incredibly blasé videos of employees talking about their jobs with the cheesy music playing behind them and no visuals of what it is actually like to work at their company.

My advice? Embrace video! Take chances. If you look and act like everyone else, then you are everyone else. The point with video, and employment branding for that matter, is to stand out in a genuine and honest way. At CloudLock, we created videos that range from poorly dubbed Karate parodies to “strutting” to a more corporate feel but with a lot of fun mixed in – because that is what CloudLock is.

Note: if you are truly genuine in how you message your employment brand some people will not like it – and that is the point. They would hate working at your company anyhow if what you are presenting is genuine and trust me – you would rather have them tap out before applying then have them join and find out weeks in the place is all wrong for them.

3. Why work for us? Let the tabs explain! – One of the cool recent product features on Glassdoor is their “Why Work For Us” tab. You now have the ability to enhance your brand in many ways you see fit; whether through presenting by functions you seek to hire (sales, engineers, etc.) or through any other creative methods you see fit.

At CloudLock, we chose to really lift the hood on what it is like to work there – because that is the essence of any effective employment brand. We have a “Life at CloudLock” tab where we show off one of our wackier videos, a section on “The Chicken Llama” – CloudLock’s mascot and a true emblem of how CloudLock operates, “Passion and Fun” which shows a ton more images but with a CloudLock touch (and more video), CloudLock’s core values and a “Fun Facts” section. Choose your own adventure here with the tabs and the possibilities are endless, but ignoring them would be a big mistake.

4. Updates. You know how you can share timely updates from your LinkedIn company page? Same thing here; however, unlike LinkedIn, the audience on Glassdoor visiting your page is 100% potentially interested in you as an employer. What a cool audience to send out your branding updates to! CloudLock shares office candid photos, videos, company cartoons, selfies and mixes in a good dose of business updates, too. Watching the traction on these updates through the built-in analytics Glassdoor provides reinforces they make an impact.

5. Unleash your employees. Here is where most companies fail with Glassdoor. It is important for any effective employment brand strategy to let your employees free on social media and sites like Glassdoor. Don’t push, and definitely do not incentivize or bribe them, but letting your employees know that if they are happy at your company and that it would be very helpful for them to get on Glassdoor, and write a review, goes a very long way. Explain to them that this will help drive other talented people like them to join you and allows the company to bring the best possible people in to help the company succeed. Explain to them why it is important but do not push. Awareness is half the battle here.

At CloudLock, this came from the highest levels of the company. At company meetings, we talk about how we are doing on attraction and explain the importance of Glassdoor. The execs do not push, but simply say if you love working here it would be really helpful to the business if you would write a review. There is absolutely no pressure put on, just rather an awareness push. CloudLock has even gone so far as to embed a link to Glassdoor prominently in the middle of their careers page. We want candidates to check us out and are very proud that employees present, and past, seem to really like working at CloudLock.

As you can see, the results have been huge and the impact great. These initiatives can all be done relatively inexpensively and will produce big results. In the case of Glassdoor, it doesn’t matter if you are 100,000 employees or 100 – the field is level.

Play ball!

The post Tips for SMBs to Stand Out on Glassdoor appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/tips-for-smbs-to-stand-out-on-glassdoor/feed/ 0
Rockstar Recruiter Series: Quirky http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-recruiter-quirky/ http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-recruiter-quirky/#comments Tue, 23 Jun 2015 16:00:02 +0000 http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=11552 I’m impressed when a candidate: Does their research and asks thoughtful questions. A candidate who is interested in an opportunity will want to do all the research necessary to find the right company for them – it’s like Googling a …Read More

The post Rockstar Recruiter Series: Quirky appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
I’m impressed when a candidate:

Does their research and asks thoughtful questions. A candidate who is interested in an opportunity will want to do all the research necessary to find the right company for them – it’s like Googling a subject you want to learn more about. Before you know it, you look up, with glassed eyes, and realize you went through a rabbit hole of information hours ago.

The point is, doing research heavily influences a candidate’s line of questioning in an interview process. This goes a long way in expressing a deep understanding of the company or the role as well as revealing a personality that is curious, inquisitive and passionate.

I’m impressed when a recruiter:

Makes an interview feel like a conversation. Interviewing is stressful! Time is not on anyone’s side and you need time when you’re getting to know someone. It takes finesse to make someone come out of an interview feeling like it was not an interview. We’re hiring people, not robots. Yes, it can be productive and fun.

I have been in the recruiting industry for:

Nine and a half years. I spent one year with a staffing firm, seven years at a security software startup called Rapid7 that grew from 40 to 400 and then a year and a half at my current social product development company, Quirky.

I know I’ve done a great job hiring when:

The team and the candidate are pumped to work with each other. One of the best feelings in the world is when you connect a candidate to their dream job and when the team feels the same about hiring their dream candidate.

I get a thrill when I’m introduced to an employee’s partner/friend as ‘the person that hired me!’ Even though I’m not the one with all of that power, it’s a nice feeling that makes my job meaningful.

The biggest challenge recruiting candidates today is:

Getting back to all candidates. Having been through the interview ringer myself, not receiving a response is worse than getting a rejection. The unknown vs. known is a mental mind bender. Should I continue holding on to hope that I’ll be contacted or should I be moving on?

At Quirky, we get thousands of applications per week and there are many reasons candidates might not get a response – sometimes the job is put on hold or it’s an inactive post that’s up year-round. But, we want everyone to have the best experience – even if that means getting a rejection.

I stay cutting edge by:

Test driving new tools and processes. There are so many wonderful tools out there for the taking! We successfully experimented with and implemented video interviews thanks to Take the Interview. We are also working with Lunchcruit – it’s like Match.com but for recruiting, where candidates can reach out to you for lunch. These tools add a dash of human touch to the recruiting process.

In 2015, I’ll invest more efforts in: 

Experimentation. We are humanizing the interview process at Quirky. There is a hiring team here who did a case study on replacing interviews with ‘shadowing.’ We define shadowing as coming in and sitting in with the team for the day. This has made a huge difference in giving candidates a chance to have a better idea of what’s under the hood.

Executives see employer branding and recruiting as:

One and the same. Successful employer branding is done with dual efforts between the recruitment and marketing teams. We work closely together on communicating the Quirky brand through all social media channels.

I use Glassdoor because:

It is a platform from the people for the people. Unlike any other platform, Glassdoor paints a realistic picture you don’t get anywhere else: the good, the bad and the ugly.  You realize it’s okay if there is negative feedback because it’s what real. Companies are going to paint cupcakes and rainbows on their websites, but with Glassdoor, perception is reality when it comes to employees and their experiences.

My success is most closely tied to:

My team and my company. I am successful with the buy-in and support from all of my team members. We help each other with an “all hands on deck” mentality. Like a sports team, it’s not about the best player, it’s about the team and how we work together.

I could improve my reputation as a recruiter if I did this:

Consistent, thoughtful communication. Especially with technical talent, there are ways to be more thoughtful and creative when it comes to approaching talent.  Linkedin isn’t the only channel to pique interest.  Platforms like github, about.me, facebook, twitter and meetup.com are other options in diversifying personalized messages and capturing the attention of A talent.

The post Rockstar Recruiter Series: Quirky appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

]]>
http://employers.glassdoor.com/blog/rockstar-recruiter-quirky/feed/ 0