Glassdoor for Employers 2015-08-26T16:00:25Z /feed/atom/ Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[Boost Your Job Post’s SEO with These Simple Steps]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12296 2015-08-21T21:12:49Z 2015-08-26T16:00:25Z Every active job seeker out there has one thing in common – they’re searching. So why not take a lesson out of the digital marketing team’s book and implement some best practices for your job post. Following just a few …Read More

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Every active job seeker out there has one thing in common – they’re searching. So why not take a lesson out of the digital marketing team’s book and implement some best practices for your job post.

Following just a few SEO (search engine optimization) tips can get your job post in front of more qualified eyeballs without paying anything extra. After all, sites with active job seekers, like Glassdoor, are fundamentally searches engines, like Google, but with a specific audience.

First things first

You’re used to building your job descriptions for human consumption, carefully selecting your words to describe the position and company. The good news is that there’s no reason to change that. However, you’ll need to make sure that both ‘bots’ (sometimes called ‘crawlers’ or ‘spiders’) and humans have an equally easy time reading your job post.

Making sure that your most important keywords are mentioned both in titles and at the top of the page will ensure that both bots and humans will know what you’re about to describe.

Organize your thoughts

Keeping your content organized helps search engines understand how your content is related to search queries, or keywords.

If you want to explain your organizations culture, the job description, and the qualifications, you should do so in distinct sections. This helps search engines understand that your company culture is fun/fast paced/entrepreneurial, but the qualifications/previous experiences required reflects a completely different set of keywords.

Speak the same language

Making sure you’re talking about the same things that prospective candidates are is crucial. Looking at resumes of qualified candidates, working with the hiring manager and reading industry blogs will help you find out how qualified candidates describe their relevant experience.

Speaking the same language as your prospective candidate will allow the search engine’s bot to make automatic connections from your listing to candidate search queries.

Don’t sacrifice relevance for cleverness

You’ll have plenty of opportunity to show how relaxed your work environment is on your company website and profile. Calling your ‘Lead Java Engineer’ a ‘Master Code Guru’ can cost you lost of relevancy and lots of eyeballs.

Act natural

SEO is often referred to as ‘natural search,’ search engines aren’t artificially manipulated by advertising dollars. So, do what feels ‘natural’ to you and relax! Communicating what you feel is right in your job posting, without over-optimizing, will almost always yield the best results.

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Jeff Frankel <![CDATA[Innovations in HR: How ECM Improves Service and Reduces C...]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12283 2015-08-21T17:37:15Z 2015-08-25T16:00:31Z By automating HR processes with ECM (enterprise content management) systems, HR departments can reduce compliance risks and the costs associated with paper management while elevating employee self-service to a new level. This is important because healthcare and legal documentation can …Read More

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By automating HR processes with ECM (enterprise content management) systems, HR departments can reduce compliance risks and the costs associated with paper management while elevating employee self-service to a new level.

This is important because healthcare and legal documentation can be overwhelming for companies of any size.

Consider this: ABC news recently reported that complying with the Affordable Care Act is costing small businesses more than $15,000 per year, simply to meet the paperwork requirements for tracking hours, absences and the amount spent on health insurance.

Making compliance more efficient

By automating HR, managers can track all of this data in a central location and leverage reporting and analytics tools that just aren’t available with paper systems.

Documenting payroll, benefits, workers compensation, OSHA and all pertinent communications becomes far more accurate and efficient without the wasted back and forth of emails, phone calls, interdepartmental mail and lines at the copier.

Saving time and cost

According to HR World, up to 80% of an HR department’s time is spent on administration and paperwork. From recruitment and training to managing staffing and employee onboarding, HR managers need all the help they can get to save time and reduce the costs associated with all the paperwork.  

With ECM, all information is stored, accessed and completed online, reducing the need for printing, copying and mailing paper, as well as allowing data to be accessed electronically for analysis and reporting.

According to Deloitte Talent Analytics research, companies “who go through the process of ‘datafying’ their HR organization are seeing 2-3x better results in quality of hire, pipelines and employee turnover.” By delivering easy access to every employee interaction—resumes, personal information, hiring and tax documentation, training manuals, performance reviews and payroll—businesses have a 360° view of each employee.

There’s another benefit: utilizing data to better manage overhead, hiring, overtime, medical benefit management and other related costs.

Self-service convenience

We are now a self-service population, using our smartphones and tablets for everything from banking and shopping to booking international travel and tracking our kids.

The use of personal electronic devices also extends to work deliverables. According to a recent Gallup Poll, one-third of employees use their mobile devices to access work after hours, and 96% of full-time American employees say they use at least one of their own devices to access work-related content.

With all HR-related documentation accessible, employees are better able to control their work lives, e.g., managing benefits and direct deposit options, updating personal information, and submitting expense reports and performance management information.

Anything that needs approvals can be automatically routed to the right person in a matter of minutes versus waiting for hard copies to be printed, copied, signed, faxed or mailed. Saving employees time on their personnel records management means they have more time to focus on the work they were hired to do, and HR departments have all the information they need in one location.

Control and protection

HR departments should have strict policies and procedures for ensuring employee records are protected. With an ECM system, all files are securely stored in a centralized database. Document access restrictions prevent confidential information from being accessed by the wrong people.

Automating HR with ECM delivers a full audit trail of opening, editing, completing, signing and printing, which decreases the risk of lost files and incomplete workflows. HR can respond quickly and accurately to state and federal Departments of Labor, health care providers, attorneys and employees. Records can also be set to self-destruct when needed, according to internal timeframes and industry regulations with data date- and time-stamped for enhanced compliance.

The case for ECM

Business today is all about leveraging the power of technology for efficiency, security and convenience.

With a number of cloud-based ECM technologies in the market, automating your HR doesn’t need to be cost prohibitive. Instead, it can be an indispensable tool for managing your most important resource at a price that’s right for small to medium businesses worldwide.

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Bob Corlett <![CDATA[The Best Way to Interview Innovative People]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12226 2015-08-17T23:03:01Z 2015-08-24T16:00:23Z Finding true innovators to run your strategically significant projects is tough. After all, it’s not easy to find individuals who can take an idea from concept and gestation to roaring success. It’s bloody hard to be on the bleeding edge …Read More

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Finding true innovators to run your strategically significant projects is tough. After all, it’s not easy to find individuals who can take an idea from concept and gestation to roaring success.

It’s bloody hard to be on the bleeding edge of innovation. Creating the future is always uncomfortable, and from day to day it usually feels like failing, until hindsight reveals how far you’ve come. (Scott Berkun’s classic book The Myths of Innovation is a must-read for those wishing to understand the nature of innovation.)

Alas, the world is full of Forrest Gumps who were present, almost accidentally, at key or successful moments in history. Unlike Gump, many of these pretenders attribute success to their own skills, hubris that often stands in the way of your innovation as surely as their inflated salary requirements impoverish a new initiative.

So what do Real Deal Innovators look like? More importantly, how do you interview them to determine if they indeed have innate innovative skills that can help your team or organization?

Innovators spend their time in the trenches

Real Deal innovators spend their time in the trenches. They are constantly experimenting and challenged by the imperative of producing results. Real innovators know that most ideas don’t survive contact with reality. But parts do. So they try things, fail, learn, refine and improve.

To uncover this aspect of innovation, during an interview, ask something like: “Tell us about a time a project you worked on failed, and whether something good (however small) came out of it.”

Innovators put their ideas into practice

Real Deal innovators put ideas into practice more than peers, extending their expertise far beyond everyone in their field. Renowned physicist Neils Bohr once said, “An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.”

For a guide to judging someone’s expertise (especially if you’re not an expert in their field), consider this brief article.

Innovators don’t deal with red tape

Real Deal innovators likely aren’t working in a place where ideas have to be approved by committee. Nor do they spend hour after hour in meetings. And they certainly don’t spend all day reporting on results instead of producing them. Innovators don’t necessarily shirk these responsibilities, but they certainly don’t like doing them. So innovators will tend to move on from any job burdened by bureaucracy and red tape, especially if either or both prevents them from doing work they need to do.

To interview for this aspect of innovation, ask something like: “Break out where you spend your time between reporting, budget, administrative and experimentation.”

Innovators rely on their metrics

Real Deal innovators allow the “tyranny of daily results” to drive their innovation, measuring themselves against hard metrics. They don’t come up with ideas and then spend time giving speeches about it. Instead, they distill actionable takeaways, changes and innovations from the data. Spending time in the trenches means they know when something isn’t working and have the numbers to prove it. Recognizing and acknowledging those failures help Real Deal Innovators successfully pivot and tweak (and when to abandon) an initiative.

Ultimately, Real Deal innovators are effective and knowledgeable. So when you’re interviewing, keep an ear open for any mention of metrics, especially in follow-up questions. Empty suits and hacks speak in platitudes; effective executives speak in specifics, recalling metrics they’re intimate with to answer your questions with specificity.

Innovators generally aren’t famous (and aren’t trying to be)

Why are Real Deal innovators not necessarily widely known? Probably because being famous is a reverse predictor—it usually takes time and effort to build fame. And many innovators would rather spend theirs on innovation. So with few exceptions, they don’t speak at the cool conferences. They may earn the respect of industry insiders for their work, but they don’t willingly engage with the PR machine.

When interviewing, don’t assume that people who are better known are more skilled. Internet fame, high-profile visibility and conference keynoting don’t necessarily mean someone is better at doing the work. It may only mean someone is better at self-promotion.

So how do you distinguish the Real Deal innovators from poseurs and pretenders? Try these:

  • Listen for the daily grind. Do they talk about the data, the metrics and the results?
  • Listen for the experimentation, the risk and the failure.
  • Listen for the grit and resilience to try again.

I’d like to leave with two final words of caution: 1) Run from people who claim their big success came easily, with no moments of uncertainty, and 2) When all is said and done, ask yourself, “Am I really ready to put up with a Real Deal Innovator?”

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[Companies Using Videos to Build Their Brand on Glassdoor]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12272 2015-08-21T17:26:57Z 2015-08-21T16:00:54Z We live in a visual world. Seventy-six percent of job seekers want details on what makes a company an attractive place to work, according to an October 2014 Glassdoor site survey. Additionally, the number one piece of information job seekers …Read More

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We live in a visual world. Seventy-six percent of job seekers want details on what makes a company an attractive place to work, according to an October 2014 Glassdoor site survey. Additionally, the number one piece of information job seekers want employers to provide as they research where to work is details on what makes an attractive place to work.

A great way to visually showcase your brand to potential candidates is through employment brand videos on your Glassdoor profile. Job seekers are already on your profile doing their homework — why not hit them with a fun, interactive video about your company perks and what makes you a great place to work while you’re at it?

Here are five companies who are skillfully showcasing their employment brand through videos on Glassdoor:

1. Cisco

Up front and center on Cisco’s Glassdoor profile are three employment brand videos. Right off the bat, these videos catch your eye as you move through their profile. Note that they’re typically two minutes or under, which is the perfect length for a job seeker’s short attention span.

Also, Cisco highlights innovative technologies in their videos, which positions them as a leader in tech innovation to job seekers. What are job seekers seeing first when they visit your Glassdoor profile?

2. Square

Looking to attract diverse job seekers like female engineers, Millennials or Veterans? Target these unique groups with your videos on Glassdoor. Square boasts seven videos on their Glassdoor profile, covering topics ranging from how they help sellers to opportunities for recent grads and big product releases.

Giving job seekers a wide variety of content that appeals to different job seekers is a great way to attract all of the diverse groups you’re looking to hire. Take a page from Square’s book and upload new branded videos to your Glassdoor profile today!

3. Equinix

Looking for more background on a potential employer? Most job seekers are. Equinix does a great job of highlighting their company’s past, present and future through “Vision”, “Sustainability” and “Careers” tabs on their Glassdoor profile.

The first video on Equinix’s page features their CEO and President, Steve Smith. In the video, he informs job seekers about the history, culture and future of Equinix.

Pro Tip: job seekers don’t always want to read paragraph after paragraph of branded content. Include this “Why Work For Us” messaging in a fun video or interview like Equinix did to mix things up.

4. Walmart

In their videos on Glassdoor, Walmart features what a great place to work they are in a video called “More Than Expected”. In it, they highlight what makes them great — factors including how much food they donate to those in need in each year and the high number of jobs they create. In appealing to a wide range of job seekers — working moms, truck drivers, pharmacists and tech gurus — Walmart successfully targets millions of job seekers in just one video that everyone can relate to.

5. Postmates

The best way to attract job seekers is to tell them upfront why they should come work for you. Postmates does just that in their employer brand video, featuring how they are transforming the way local goods move around cities.

They also highlight what makes their company different — their passion for local goods, how easy and widely-used their product is and how they help people everywhere. These key differentiators attract the right kind of job seeker, which is exactly what Postmates is trying to do.

Getting started with videos

Not sure where to get started? If you have great videos already made, consider partnering with Glassdoor to start uploading videos to your profile today! If not, make it a priority to devote budget and time to creating a “Why Work For Us” video. No budget? No problem! Shoot one in-house with your own equipment (iPhones have great cameras!) or ask your employees to shoot videos at company offsites or team events. Even one or two videos can completely change the way job seekers view your company.

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Ambrosia Vertesi <![CDATA[When Open Source And HR Collide]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12235 2015-08-17T23:38:56Z 2015-08-21T16:00:11Z Transparency. It’s a term we use a lot in HR. This idea of openness is often applied to areas like employer branding — sharing culture openly to help organizations more effectively draw talent that aligns with their culture and organizational values. …Read More

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Transparency. It’s a term we use a lot in HR. This idea of openness is often applied to areas like employer branding — sharing culture openly to help organizations more effectively draw talent that aligns with their culture and organizational values.
We’ve adopted this approach at Hootsuite, empowering our peeps around the world to “work out loud” and share their experience. Our culture is built on the foundation of a passionate, egoless team having fun and building something bigger than ourselves, free to find new ways to share and give back to our respective communities, including HR.
Open source comes to HR

We recently launched a new initiative within our HR team called Open Source HR (#HootHROS). The idea is to empower our HR team to share what we’re working on, what we’re learning and where we’re finding inspiration.

This initiative also includes bringing transparency into our HR projects by creating detailed case studies—e. g., a recent global Periscope branding campaign, #FollowTheSun—breaking down where ideas came from, how we pitched and executed, metrics and results, and what we got wrong. Yes, what we got wrong.

Sharing mistakes

That last part is really important, and highlights why transparency in HR matters. You might think a company like Hootsuite has advantages when it comes to Social HR, and you’d be right, but that doesn’t mean we don’t make mistakes.

Illuminating and sharing our mistakes in our case studies shows that, by nature, many social HR efforts are experimental. That means there’s always a degree of risk and unknown, but if you embrace that and see them as learning opportunities, you can help move your HR team forward, faster. Leading with humility is a core value at our organization. So being committed to sharing (no matter the outcome) aligns us.

Scaling open source HR

Without a doubt, open source technology has been an incredible boon for software development. Now, imagine the benefits if more organizations embraced open-source HR, sharing their hard-won best practices and successful initiatives in recruiting, talent development, onboarding and retention! We’re in, are you?

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Erin MCGaughey <![CDATA[Rockstar Recruiter Series: WilsonHCG]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12218 2015-08-18T16:00:00Z 2015-08-20T16:00:07Z I’m impressed when a candidate: Does research. Candidates impress me the most when, prior to our initial interview, they do their due diligence and thoroughly research the company as well as industry. Having knowledge of recent company news, our services and our company …Read More

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I’m impressed when a candidate:

Does research. Candidates impress me the most when, prior to our initial interview, they do their due diligence and thoroughly research the company as well as industry. Having knowledge of recent company news, our services and our company culture helps candidates raise thoughtful questions during interviews.

I’m impressed when a recruiter:

Sets clear expectations of the interview process and provides timely feedback. Today, the candidate experience has taken a front seat as organizations look to improve their talent acquisition strategy. Setting clear expectations and providing timely feedback builds not only a trusting relationship, but sets the stage in how the candidate can expect a company to communicate with its employees.

I have been in the recruiting industry for:

A while! Since joining WilsonHCG two years ago, my focus has been outsourcing (RPO).

I know I’ve done a great job hiring when:

A candidate receives an offer—my true satisfaction. I know I’ve done my hiring job when managers share success stories of the direct impact their team members make each day with clients.

The biggest challenge recruiting candidates today is:

Gaining candidate trust and buy-in, due to the overwhelming demand and un-humanized approach many recruiters take. Recruiters can combat this challenge by taking a genuine and personal approach to their messaging and avenues used to make initial contacts.

I stay cutting edge by:

Keeping up with new deep-dive sourcing strategies. At WilsonHCG, we have fantastic thought leaders focused on uncovering and sharing new tools. More specifically, WilsonHCG has a brand ambassador team with an ambassador dedicated to researching alternative and niche sourcing techniques. They share best practices with our team, which helps me put them in motion.

CareersAtWilsonHCG

In 2015, I’ll invest more efforts in:

Building out my internal recruitment marketing strategy. Ensuring I stay proactive and continue to welcome (and implement) cutting-edge techniques are top priorities. Meanwhile, I also want to spend time and effort developing my personal social brand as a recruiter. As the face of WilsonHCG, it’s in my best interest (and my company’s) to stay ahead of trends and set a positive example.

Executives see employer branding and recruiting as:

Key differentiators in attracting talent today. Candidates yearn for transparent companies and judge them based on how active they are on social media, such as sharing content within a talent community. From a higher-level perspective, executives ultimately see employer branding and recruiting as a multifaceted form of marketing. Recruitment marketing, in fact, is a growing trend and instrumental in helping organizations stand out and attract talent.

I use Glassdoor because:

Candidates care about feedback. Glassdoor is always one of my go-to market research tools when it comes to evaluating the competitive landscape. I also use it as an indicator of our success in delivering a streamlined interview process. On Glassdoor, candidates share honest feedback about their interview experiences, everything from how many rounds they went through to how difficult interviewers’ questions were.

Regarding reputation management, having a strong and positive employer reputation is critical to our recruiting success. I am constantly thinking of new ways I can improve my reputation within the recruiting space. My action plan includes engaging in more Twitter Chats, webinars and thought leadership initiatives across the talent acquisition community.

My success is most closely tied to:

A handful of mentors (and friends!) at WilsonHCG who have taken the time to invest in my professional growth. There are a number of ways you can get involved as a new-hire mentor or a companywide trainer; however, I am thankful for both colleagues and managers who have gone the extra mile to help my professional growth.

I could improve my reputation as a recruiter if I:

Engaged in more Twitter Chats, webinars and thought leadership initiatives across the talent acquisition community. I plan to!

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[[QUIZ] Why Does Your Company’s Reputation Matter?]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12157 2015-08-19T15:28:40Z 2015-08-19T16:00:57Z When was the last time you thought long and hard about your company’s reputation? With the rise in popularity of review sites like Glassdoor, odds are you’ve been forced to think more about your company’s reputation and how it’s affecting …Read More

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When was the last time you thought long and hard about your company’s reputation? With the rise in popularity of review sites like Glassdoor, odds are you’ve been forced to think more about your company’s reputation and how it’s affecting everything from your hiring process to your company culture. But really, why is your company’s reputation (and managing it) so important?

Here are a few reasons why you should care about your company’s reputation:

Potential candidates care

Sixty-nine percent of job seekers would not take a job with a company with a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed, according to Corporate Responsibility Magazine. Think about that for a second: over two-thirds of job seekers wouldn’t work for your company if they saw that you had a poor reputation online. And if people don’t want to work for you, hiring is going to be quite difficult. The more you invest in managing your reputation now, the easier it will be to hire quality candidates down the road.

Current employees and your company culture depend on it

Even more shocking, 84% would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent reputation. Worried about retaining your current employees? Up your reputation management game and really focus on listening to feedback, implementing change and making your current employees happy will help you retain them in the long-run.

Plus, 69% agree their perception of a company improves after seeing an employer respond to a review, so get a Glassdoor Free Employer account today and start managing your reputation!

Highlight key initiatives

There’s a large discrepancy between how great employers think they’re doing and what their employees actually think — and many companies are falling behind because of it. For example, 67% of job seekers find diversity incredibly important, and 57% of people think their company should be doing more to promote diversity initiatives. It’s a bad sign if your employees aren’t aware of programs you’re running — so communicate them! It’s your job to manage your reputation online so both current and prospective employees can see what you’re doing in certain areas to improve and what’s attractive about your company vs. your competition.

Interested to learn more? Take our Company Reputation Quiz to see how your knowledge of your company’s reputation stacks up and learn tips along the way of how you can improve.



You can also learn more about the importance of reputation management in this blog post. Get started today!

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Guest Contributor http://employers.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[Making Sure the Cup Stays Full at Starbucks]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12255 2015-08-18T20:51:27Z 2015-08-18T19:00:04Z This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post. Authored by Sophie Sakellariadis, Co-authored by Alex Cole and Jess Stein Background: Employee engagement in the retail industry has long been an uphill battle, but Starbucks has been a trailblazer in the …Read More

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This article originally appeared on the Huffington Post.

Authored by Sophie Sakellariadis, Co-authored by Alex Cole and Jess Stein

Background: Employee engagement in the retail industry has long been an uphill battle, but Starbucks has been a trailblazer in the field, pioneering generous health benefits, tuition support, and long-term career development programs. But are these efforts paying off? Critically, have they impacted the mindsets employees hold about Starbucks in a way that fuels retention, recruitment, and ultimately profit? Using over 5,000 company reviews from Glassdoor.com, Monitor 360 applied its Narrative AnalyticsTM methodology to uncover the narratives that employees hold about Starbucks and identify opportunities for Starbucks–and others in the retail industry–to improve employee engagement initiatives, optimize its externally-facing employment brand, and drive business success.

The business challenge: improve employee engagement and employment brand to reduce turnover and enhance recruitment

In the world of retail, Starbucks is an undisputed champion of employee engagement, recruitment, and retention. CEO Howard Schultz claims that Starbucks’ relationship “with our people and the culture of our company is our most sustainable competitive advantage.” The company prides itself on its “legendary service,” and supports wide- ranging perks for members of the Starbucks “family”–including full health benefits for part-time employees and unprecedented tuition reimbursement for Arizona State University’s online courses–that frequently attract top recruits in the retail industry.

Starbucks’ innovations in employee engagement have yielded tangible results, contributing to an average rating on Glassdoor.com of 3.8 stars out of 5–compared to 2.8 for Dunkin Donuts and 3.2 for Peet’s Coffee–and helping Starbucks to beat the average industry turnover rate by 140%. Yet in spite of its impressive performance in relation to its peers, the level of turnover at Starbucks is still costly, requiring the company to invest $3,000 to replace just one barista.

What more can the company do to close the door on employee exits and attract high- quality recruits? Beyond just offering more expensive perks, how can Starbucks leadership identify what motivates their 190,000 employees, and more effectively connect with–and shape–existing beliefs employees hold about the company that affect morale and inform the perception of their “employment brand” with prospective employees?

The goal: uncover organizational narratives that present opportunities to bolster employee engagement

Monitor 360 set out to understand the “why” behind employee satisfaction at Starbucks–to uncover what employees really believe about the company, and identify new opportunities to more effectively shape engagement initiatives. Using our Narrative Analytics methodology, we analyzed over 5,000 U.S.-based employee reviews of Starbucks on Glassdoor.com. Through our analysis, we surfaced six distinct organizational narratives that employees hold about the company, and measured their Narrative Volume.

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The good: narratives about the rewards of working at Starbucks drive a strong community spirit

More than 60% of employee comments expressed confidence in Starbucks’ senior leadership and company vision. The three narratives that comprised this coverage– “Starbucks the Star,” “Grueling with a Shot of Great,” and “‘Ground’ by Middle Management”–focused more on employees’ pride in Starbucks’ vision and values than on benefits, suggesting that consistently delivering an inspiring narrative about the value of employees to the company can motivate as much as offering free lattes. What’s more, the two highest volume narratives–“Starbucks the Star” and “Grueling with a Shot of Great”–suggest that Starbucks can be an exciting place to build a career.

Moreover, even negative narratives like “Part Time Pariah” and “Baristas are the Backbone” praised the benefits and perks that Starbucks provides. Interestingly, these narratives referenced employees’ satisfaction with cost-efficient benefits, like free coffee and parking, more often than more costly ones like excellent healthcare coverage–indicating that sweeteners small and large can deepen employee satisfaction.

The bad: limited growth opportunities and middle management disconnect

While narratives like “Starbucks the Star” and “Grueling with a Shot of Great” depict Starbucks as an exciting place to build a career, narratives like “Part Time Pariah” and “Baristas are the Backbone” bemoan the difficulties of building a career at Starbucks–revealing one critical driver of employee turnover. While less prominent than positive narratives about the company’s vision and values, combined they comprise a concerning 31 percent of total employee comments.

The “‘Ground’ by Middle Management” narrative suggests that many employees who have a positive view of Starbucks as a corporation simultaneously hold major concerns about middle management. Many view middle managers as out of touch– visiting stores infrequently and promoting those who are undeserving. This suggests that leadership’s efforts to brand Starbucks as a place for opportunity resonate deeply with employees on an emotional level, but that same vision is not regularly communicated by local company leadership nor does the inspiring vision always match the day-to-day reality.

Though it was lowest in volume, the “Glorified Fast Food” narrative also posses potential existential challenges to Starbucks’ internally and externally facing brand. This narrative reflects employee beliefs that Starbucks is losing its identity as a specialty brewer, suggesting that replacing the art of brewing with increased mechanization can damage retention. This narrative also presents threats to Starbucks’ external brand: Should it spill over to Starbucks’ customer base, it could endanger Starbucks positioning as a provider of “special experience” that founder Howard Schultz refers to as the “third place”, undermining its ability to charge premium prices.

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Recommendations for Starbucks: amplify the positive, address management disconnect, and identify triggers of new threats to the company’s speciality brand

What can Starbucks learn from the narratives their employees hold to maintain its competitive edge in recruitment, retention, and engagement?

Amplify narratives connected to company values. High impact narratives like “Starbucks the Star” suggest that Starbucks employees are uniquely motivated by the company vision and commitment to employee engagement. Starbucks should articulate this vision to employees consistently and continually to ensure this narrative remains top of mind. At the same time, it’s critical to continue to deliver generous perks and rewards to employees to ensure that employees feel the message from leadership is credible. If Starbucks faces pressure to cut costs, it would be wise to avoid cutting these perks as doing so risks increasing employee turnover.

Address concerns around “‘Ground’ by Middle Management.” By assessing narratives that arise in internal survey comments tagged with key demographic indicators, such as geography, age, or position, Starbucks can pinpoint where concerns about middle management are most acute, and build a targeted strategy to address those concerns. For example, Starbucks could build training programs in regions where the “‘Ground’ By Middle Management” narrative is more prevalent to foster more productive interactions between lower and middle level employees, and expose managers to daily challenges in stores that they can help to address.

Reframe “Glorified Fast Food.” Starbucks can invest in understanding what triggers the “Glorified Fast Food” narrative before the narrative creates existential threats to the company’s consumer facing brand as well as their employment brand. With proper data and deeper analysis, Starbucks can uncover the actions, communications, or strategic decisions that inflame this narrative, such as investment in drive-through locations or replacing manual processes with machines. Examining the narratives that consumers espouse about Starbucks in social and traditional media outlets can also help leadership to monitor and address the threats this narrative presents.

Recommendations for other retail companies: reduce turnover by shaping employee narratives

What can other companies learn from Starbucks’ employee engagement strategy? To better connect with employees on their own terms, other companies should leverage the wealth of online data from sites like Glassdoor as well as existing investments in internal data to understand what employees are saying about them, and gain insight into the narratives that drive perceptions and behavior. Versions of narratives like “‘Ground by Middle Management” exist in many companies, the trick is understanding what triggers them. Companies should consciously design their communication and engagement initiatives around the unique narratives their employees hold to ensure that they resonate with employees, and address their unique concerns. Firms can then monitor narrative changes over time, measure the impact of communication activities, and adjust tactics to improve employee engagement.

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[5 Tips on Writing Great Job Descriptions]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12203 2015-08-17T22:28:59Z 2015-08-18T16:00:17Z Today’s job seekers have a lot of choice for jobs. They’re also busy and worried about making the right career choice. Is it any wonder they’re harder and harder for talent pros to source and engage? If your organization has …Read More

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Today’s job seekers have a lot of choice for jobs. They’re also busy and worried about making the right career choice.

Is it any wonder they’re harder and harder for talent pros to source and engage?

If your organization has open positions, your job descriptions (and job titles) need to be on point, easy to digest and sell not only your open positions but your organization and employer brand, too.

That can be a tall order for equally busy hiring managers, who may default to simple cookie-cutter job descriptions that, unfortunately, undersell what makes their company and positions unique. And that invite the less qualified to apply.

What job seekers consider

Based on October 2014 Glassdoor research, here are the top five factors candidates consider before accepting a job offer:

  1. Salary and Compensation
  2. Career Growth Opportunities
  3. Work-Life Balance
  4. Location/Commute
  5. Company Culture and Values

Winning job descriptions should take each into consideration. With that in mind, let’s take a look at five best practices.

1. Get real with the job title

Temper your creative juices for a moment. Rather than dressing up your job titles with flowery keywords like “Guru,” “Superstar” or “Hero,” opt for real-life keywords like “Sales Account Manager,” “Human Resources Director,” “B2B Social Media Specialist” or “SQL Database Programmer.”

Especially on search engines, this simple action will help place your job openings in front of far more job seekers, who are much less likely to look for openings with eccentric keywords.

2. Customize the role to the mission

Describe how the role ties into your company mission and culture. This will help you attract candidates who will do well in your workplace.

Mention exciting or challenging projects candidates will work on—compensation alone is not enough to woo today’s candidates. Think career growth!

Another good idea is to include links to in-house videos that showcase the department or team the role reports to. That, coupled with links to great reviews of you company on Glassdoor, give candidates an “inside look” at your company culture and work/life balance, a great way to build trust between company and ideal-fit employees.

Finally, don’t forget playing up a short commute, local transit options and other nice work/life balance factors.

3. Be flexible with job requirements

Don’t go crazy here. In fact, be judicious—too many requirements or an extensive laundry list of skills may deter potentially great candidates from applying—especially younger applicants like new grads, whose lack of experience may be offset by enthusiasm, desire and potential.

Clearly settle on your “minimum” and “preferred” qualifications. Candidates can view the latter as optional or a non-requirement, which can ultimately lead to lower-quality applications.

4. Format for mobile

Remember, more and more job seekers look for jobs on their phone. That makes it mandatory to avoid dense, lengthy paragraphs in your job descriptions. Instead, shorten things up, use bullet points liberally and sprinkle in subheads between sections for easy scanning.

You’ll never go wrong keeping things direct, short and simple—especially for job seekers on the go.

5. Do your research

Looking for a little competitive intelligence? Google the titles of your open positions to learn how others position their roles—there’s no shame in mimicking a good approach.

For further inspiration (it’s not creeping!), see what roles your nearest competitors are promoting and how they sell their culture and organization.

In summary

To drive interest, engage candidates and leverage your company brand and culture to encourage great candidates to apply, tailor your job descriptions to both your target candidate and fit for your company culture. Remember to:

  • Keep your job titles real and “guru-free.”
  • Customize the role to the mission.
  • Don’t scare away candidates with too many job requirements.
  • Optimize job descriptions for on-the-go mobile users.
  • For inspiration, do competitive intelligence.

For more helpful advice, download our free How to Write Great Job Descriptions template.

The post 5 Tips on Writing Great Job Descriptions appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[5 Reasons Why You Should Live Stream #GDSummit]]> http://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=12124 2015-08-14T15:34:49Z 2015-08-17T16:00:14Z This year’s Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit, Sept. 25, 2015 in San Francisco, is going to be a full day of employer branding, employee engagement and candidate experience best practices from true experts who live and breathe this stuff. Need a little more convincing? Here are five reasons why …Read More

The post 5 Reasons Why You Should Live Stream #GDSummit appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

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This year’s Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit, Sept. 25, 2015 in San Francisco, is going to be a full day of employer brandingemployee engagement and candidate experience best practices from true experts who live and breathe this stuff.

Need a little more convincing? Here are five reasons why you should live stream this year’s #GDSummit right from your desktop, tablet, or mobile device

1. We’ve got the biggest names in branding. Kicking off the day will be Spencer Rascoff, CEO of Zillow. He’s got a 99% approval rating on Glassdoor and plans to share Zillow’s employer branding and talent acquisition best practices. You won’t want to miss Spencer!

The rest of the speaker lineup includes employer branding gurus like Stacy Zapar, Celinda Appelby (Oracle), Jennifer Newbill (Dell), Richard Mosley (Universum), and JT O’Donnell, industry analysts Josh Bersin, William Tincup, and Madeline Laurano, and other leaders from SalesforceEdelmanEnterprise HoldingsGlassdoor, and Intacct Corporation.

2. We don’t “do” boring. The Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit is your chance to enjoy action-packed 30 minute sessions from highly engaged speakers who are the best at what they do. Frankly, who wouldn’t want employer branding insights from superstars at Zillow, Dell and Salesforce?

3. You’ll gain actionable tips you can implement right away. Your time is precious, so we don’t want to waste it. Register to watch the Employer Branding Summit for access to speaker decks, and video sessions after the event, with plenty of opportunities take notes and even screenshot actionable to-do lists while you the event live.

We plan to cover a lot of ground quickly in each session so you won’t find yourself watching the clock, waiting for each session to end. Whether you’re tuning in from office or home, this will likely be the most productive day you’ve spent in a long time.

4. You can pop in and out of the live stream throughout the day. We have the entire Summit agenda on our registration page – check it out! Feel free to either set up camp and watch the entire day (which we highly recommend!) or note the top speakers you’d like to hear from in your calendar.

5. You’ll get access to instant replays (and more!). All live stream registrants will receive online videos of all sessions directly following the event, so you can refer back and leverage these insights for months to come! Feel free to also share the sessions with teammates and spread the knowledge to the rest of your company. Encourage them to register for the event at www.gdsummit.com.

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Be sure to register to live stream this year’s Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit to save your spot!

The post 5 Reasons Why You Should Live Stream #GDSummit appeared first on Glassdoor for Employers.

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