Glassdoor for Employers 2016-02-05T17:00:01Z /feed/atom/ J.T. O'Donnell <![CDATA[11 Things Smart Recruiters Share With Candidates]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13517 2016-02-03T17:30:03Z 2016-02-05T17:00:01Z This year, as the war for talent gets more competitive, smart recruiters will stand out by focusing on their recruiter brand. Having studied today’s job seeker in-depth over the last year, our company researched and analyzed what candidates need from …Read More

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This year, as the war for talent gets more competitive, smart recruiters will stand out by focusing on their recruiter brand. Having studied today’s job seeker in-depth over the last year, our company researched and analyzed what candidates need from recruiters to trust them. Turns out, if your recruiter brand isn’t strong enough (think celebrity status), the top talent you seek will ignore you and your company.

The 1,000,000+ job seekers who visit CAREEREALISM every month were very clear in what is required for them to respect a recruiter and their employer. Here’s what candidates want you to tell them upfront:

  1. How do you like to be contacted about a job? Do you prefer email, LinkedIn, or the company’s online ATS?
  1. What is the right way to follow up on an application? How long should they wait and what’s the best method of contact?
  1. What are some things that impress you about a candidate? Think about your most recent hiring successes. What did those candidates do to stand out to you?
  1. What must candidates include to be considered? What makes your job easier so you can screen a candidate in, as opposed to screening them out?
  1. What can get a candidate disqualified? What makes you put a candidate immediately in the “no” pile and why?
  1. Can candidates apply to multiple job openings without penalty? Does your company frown on candidates applying to more than one job at the same time?
  1. What’s your favorite quote? What do you believe in and what quote sums it up best?
  1. What do you do in your free time? What kinds of hobbies and pursuits make you happy?
  1. Why do you enjoy working for the company? Why does this job satisfy you professionally?
  1. How does your company have fun? How do you and your co-workers enjoy yourselves on the job?
  1. How would you describe the people that work at the company? What characteristics come to mind when you think of your teammates at the company?

By sharing a little bit about the recruiting process and the employment culture, you are giving top talent the information they need to feel more confident about their ability to apply successfully to your positions.

Additionally, you feel less like a stranger to them, and more like an approachable expert – which will lead to more passive candidates accepting your calls and responding to your proactive emails. In short, the more information you give them, the more likely they are to connect with you.

Afraid of getting slammed with applicants? Don’t be.

Our studies show that job seekers, especially top talent, have “online application fatigue.” They’re tired of applying online and never hearing back. In fact, 40%+ of our readers said they would never apply to a company again after they applied once and didn’t hear back. Why? They don’t like the feeling of rejection and assume the lack of a response means the company is saying “no” to them as a candidate permanently.

Thus, people are doing more research and taking a longer time to decide if they want to apply to a company. The result? Today’s job seekers are being more selective and applying to fewer jobs. Which means you need to really beef up and promote your recruiter brand to get the applicant traffic you need.

Brand or be branded

Many recruiters will read this post and ignore the need to assess and develop their recruiter brand. The most common reason will be, “I’m too busy doing my job to do this.” To those I say, “brand or BE branded.” Without a good recruiter brand your ability to do your job will only get harder.

Moreover, building your brand doesn’t take a lot of time or money. But, the longer you wait, the harder it will be to catch up to those that recognized and seized the opportunity to build up their recruiting reputations.

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Chris Murphy <![CDATA[What Recruiters Can Learn from the NFL]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13040 2016-02-04T21:56:24Z 2016-02-04T17:00:13Z The NFL made an estimated $12 billion dollars last year, ranking it as the world’s highest grossing sports league. The buzz the NFL has created around its players and their lives is all part of the NFL experience – and …Read More

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The NFL made an estimated $12 billion dollars last year, ranking it as the world’s highest grossing sports league. The buzz the NFL has created around its players and their lives is all part of the NFL experience – and largely responsible for the success of the organization. Recruiters and brand managers that seek to market that which makes their company unique can learn a lot from the way the sports industry capitalizes on the star power of the players to build relationships with audiences.

How do they do this?

The NFL strategically curates content such as player stories, personalized stadium experiences, and locker room coverage in order to extend the team story outside field lines. Football fans are loyal and this stems from the personal connections they feel towards players. So how does the NFL, an organization with 1600+ players, build relationships between fans and players in a game where everyone is typically hidden under helmets?

Fred Gaudelli, the producer of Sunday Night Football, decided to introduce players in quick videos on the screen shortly after kickoff. In fewer than 10 words, players introduce themselves, their position, and alma mater. Gaudelli shares that he incorporated the introductions because “they spice up what’s otherwise a ‘throwaway’ item during games.”

A video of someone introducing themselves is far more valuable and personal than a list of names or a photo accompanied by statistics. Forty-percent of people respond better to visual content than plain text and, by some measures, the information retained in 10 seconds of video is equal to about 30,000 written words. While your message remains the same, you’re able to better resonate with your audience and share content that exudes authenticity and personality.

NBC sportscaster Al Michaels shares “I’ve always loved this concept…It brings the players to life. Brief as it is, it gives the viewers a little insight. Is this guy smiling? Is this guy animated? Is this guy in need of anger management? If you can glance into a guy’s soul in two seconds, this is as good a way as any.”

The recruiter takeaway

Your employees are your most valuable assets, they are the people who bring your company’s mission and values to life, they’re your star players. Consider it your job to make candidates feel toward your company’s employees the same way NFL fans feel toward NFL players.

Within the realm of sports marketing, fan identification is when an individual identifies so strongly with a team and its players that he/she feels apart of that team. Sports marketers curate content promoting the players and their lives to heighten identification and build a group of loyal brand ambassadors that extends across generations. If your goal is to get top talent to see themselves working at your organization – and it should be – you need to create stories that are relatable. And the best stories revolve around people.

Fortunately, wIth visual media, a little goes a long way. If you consider body language, facial cues, and the 36,000 visual messages per hour that can be registered by the human eye, it’s not hard to see why humans are hardwired to process visual concepts more efficiently than textual information.

Your highest-performing employees are also your most busy employees, so look for easy ways to feature them with videos or photos – a quick video introduction recorded with your smartphone or a set of photos with descriptions from your hiring managers – a little goes a long way. See for example how much personality shines through in this 2 second clip of Tony Gonzalez. Your small request will have a big impact on your recruiting efforts.

You don’t need a lot of time on camera, extensive editing, or a big budget to make an impact with visuals. Take a page out of the NFL’s playbook; try getting your hiring managers, leadership or brand ambassadors to introduce themselves with no more than a name.

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[Roundup: Top Recruiting Articles This Month]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13507 2016-02-03T17:22:14Z 2016-02-03T17:00:29Z With 2016 well underway, here are 10 great recruiting articles from January that will help you stick to those New Year’s resolutions and perhaps even inspire you to upgrade your current processes: 1. Glassdoor’s Top Jobs of 2016: Data Scientists Are …Read More

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With 2016 well underway, here are 10 great recruiting articles from January that will help you stick to those New Year’s resolutions and perhaps even inspire you to upgrade your current processes:

1. Glassdoor’s Top Jobs of 2016: Data Scientists Are on Top

We recently released our 25 Best Jobs in America list. At No. 1: Data Scientist, followed closely by Tax Manager and Solutions Architect. See why it’s good to be into metrics at Tech.Co.

2. The 7 Building Blocks of Creating a Robust Diversity Hiring Program

Creating a diverse workforce isn’t a surface-level issue — it’s one that will truly impact your organization for the better. However, according to Recruiting Trends, creating an inclusive workforce is easier said than done. Here are seven ways to create a robust diversity hiring program at your organization.

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3. Equal Pay, More Work Perks: 5 Job Search Trends for 2016 According to Glassdoor

Do you know what factors are top of mind for job seekers in 2016? Forty-five percent of job seekers will be looking for a new job this year, now it’s your job to find out what attracts them. Read more in the Today.com article Equal Pay, More Work Perks: 5 Job Search Trends for 2016 According to Glassdoor.

4. 2016 Report Shows the Importance in Employer Brand, Quality of Hire

We expect to witness two important employer trends in 2016: 1) Strengthening employer brand, and (2) Focusing on quality of hire. After all, they go hand in hand in recruiting highly qualified candidates. Expect expert tips for both in this Business 2 Community article.

5. The Employment Outlook For 2016 is Looking Much Brighter

According to NPR, the employment outlook is looking great for 2016! The Labor Department reported that employers around the country added 292,000 jobs in December 2015 alone, heading into 2016 strong and optimistic.

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6. My 16 Workplace Predictions for 2016

We love a good opinion piece, and Forbes is back with its workplace predictions for 2016. Among its Top 16: employee turnover due to the prosperous economy, results-driven strategies (as opposed to face time) ruling the roost, and workers continuing to flood Glassdoor to voice their opinions about companies, management and jobs.

7. Why Employee Referrals Matter More Than You Think

What are you doing to encourage employee referrals? Odds are you need to step your game up in 2016. Learn why interview sources really count in the hiring process courtesy this Talent Management article highlighting the importance of a healthy employee referral program using Glassdoor data.

8. Embrace Mobile Recruiting and Attract More Candidates

When was the last time you took a good, hard look at your mobile recruiting strategy? We believe 2016 is the year of mobile apply–candidates now expect to be able to view your open positions and apply from anywhere, especially on smartphones and tablets.  The time is now to up your mobile recruiting strategy!

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9. 4 Trends to Watch in the Big Economic Shift from Wages to Benefits

One of the biggest economic trends taking place is a shift from focusing only on wages to an emphasis on benefits. Find out why in this Huffington Post article, written by Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor’s Chief Economist.

10. Salary, Job Tenure & Boring Work Top Reasons UK Employees Resign

With January the most popular month for job searches, we looked into why employees in the UK leave their jobs. Unsurprisingly, the top reasons include salary concerns, job tenure and boring work.

Want more? Follow Glassdoor for Employers on Twitter for more news articles and updates from Glassdoor.

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[The Winning Recipe for Company Culture with HubSpot]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13504 2016-02-01T19:47:27Z 2016-02-02T17:00:08Z What makes candidates choose your company over another and what makes your long-term employees stay? For many employees, it boils down to the culture—and in a candidate-driven market, culture might be all it takes to differentiate your company from another. …Read More

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What makes candidates choose your company over another and what makes your long-term employees stay? For many employees, it boils down to the culture—and in a candidate-driven market, culture might be all it takes to differentiate your company from another.

According to Deloitte, “culture and engagement” was cited as top challenge by 87% of HR leaders around the world. Companies that get their culture right and communicate it both within and without the organization have an easier time filling positions and keeping employees happy.

Hubspot is one of the companies that cracked the culture code, landing at #4 among large companies on Glassdoor’s 2016 Best Places to Work List. Additionally, the Slideshare presentation “Hubspot Culture Code” went viral in 2013 and received nearly two million views.

Wouldn’t it be great to know their secret to creating a killer culture code?

The Company Culture Cookbook

This year, we partnered with Hubspot to create the Company Culture Cookbook, which shares the winning recipe for creating a top-notch culture along with a template to immediately lay out your company’s unique culture and get started. In this new eBook, you’ll learn the main ingredients that go into a winning culture. When you put them together in your company’s own unique way, you’ll gain the benefits of educated candidates and happier employees.

Here’s a preview of the main ingredients:

1. Values

When was the last time you re-evaluated your company’s mission and values? Could your employees rattle off your values without thinking twice? A clearly articulated list of values is ineffective if your employees can’t remember them and validate those traits for you on social.

Make sure your mission and values are reinforced by displaying them in the office as well on your website and Glassdoor. It never hurts to have posters or wall art in your office that remind your employees what it means to work for your company and get them excited to come into work every day!

2. People

Values are more than words on a page, screen, or wall; they are lived out in the actions of your leaders, managers, and employees. Employee engagement happens one employee at a time, so take care of the biggest asset to your company’s culture — your people!

To do this, host team events and celebrate wins, both big and small. Listen to the feedback your employees leave and actually implement any changes needed.

3. Policies

Policies reinforce your values, whether you know it or not. When was the last time you took a good, hard look at your policies? Are they corporate jargon or do they match the culture of your organization? Are there any policies that seem outdated and could be refreshed? Going through this exercise every quarter can help your organization grow and keep your current employees happy.

4. Perks, benefits & career development

According to a January 2015 Glassdoor Site Survey, the top five pieces of information job seekers want employers to provide as they research where to work were:

  1. Details on compensation packages
  2. Details on benefits packages
  3. Basic company information
  4. Details on what makes the company an attractive place to work
  5. Company mission, vision and values

Give the people what they want! Now that you know what types of information job seekers are looking for, update your policies and inform job seekers from the get-go about benefits you offer at your company and why your employees love coming to work every day.

5. Workspace

The physical location and interior of your office also communicate your company’s values in a big way. When candidates walk into your office to interview, your workspace is oftentimes their second or third impression of your organization. Ensure that it validates all the values you’ve sold them on for the interview! Similarly, your employees want to work in an office that matches the culture and values you’ve established as a brand.

To showcase your great workspace, add photos on your website and Glassdoor page of your office space to give candidates an idea of what to expect when they arrive for the interview. Also, allow employees to promote your great office on social media as well! We know that a great culture doesn’t happen overnight and takes constant work and reinforcement from within.

Download the Company Culture Cookbook and Template for action steps that you can take to create your own winning company culture today!

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Glassdoor Team http://www.glassdoor.com <![CDATA[How to Turn Around a Negative Employer Brand]]> http://10.208.39.28/employers/current/blog/?p=1733 2016-02-01T17:40:44Z 2016-02-01T17:00:43Z A positive employer brand means your company is a best place to work for your target audience. But what if your company is not a best place to work? Maybe a recent layoff, negative press, or a longstanding reputation for low pay …Read More

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A positive employer brand means your company is a best place to work for your target audience. But what if your company is not a best place to work? Maybe a recent layoff, negative press, or a longstanding reputation for low pay is standing in your way of attracting the top talent your company needs.

It won’t happen overnight, but changing your image is possible. Here are six steps to help you turn around a negative employer brand:

Develop the message. Start by determining what new messages you want to send about your workplace. Consider making a list of your company’s strengths and weaknesses as an employer. Then develop a message to highlight your strengths and to counter your weaknesses. Develop a list of frequently asked questions and answers to post on your careers website and to share with employees, recruiters and candidates. Test your new message with employees, and use external focus groups and surveys to refine your message.

Address the culture. If your negative employer brand is a result of an undesirable corporate culture, first take steps to change the culture. You’ll need buy-in from top management, but you must create the culture you want to promise to potential employees.

Incentivize employees to make referrals. Getting referrals from current employees is one of the best ways to build a strong employer brand; if current employees are referring others to your company, they are likely sharing positive information about your workplace. Encourage them to do this by offering rewards for every hire who was referred by a current employee. See video: Get Social and Get More Referrals

Develop an internship program. By building a strong internship program that gives interns a valuable work experience as well as a fun opportunity, you’ll help establish your company as a student-friendly environment and encourage positive word-of-mouth communication about your workplace among students, college faculty, former interns and their families.

Partner with public relations and marketing. Join forces with the public relations and marketing departments to communicate the messages you want to send about your workplace. Explain how establishing your company as a best place to work can positively affect the entire organization, and a positive employer brand can help cement a positive consumer brand. Public relations and marketing professionals can help you craft the right messages for the right mediums to reach your target audience. That might include crafting employee-friendly copy for ads, or placing articles about positive things your workplace is doing in local or industry publications.

Build an online presence. In addition to your company’s careers website, take time to develop an online presence on the sites where your target audience spends time. Those will likely include Glassdoor, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Google+ and Pinterest. Develop profile pages that tell the story of what it’s like to work at your company. Use videos, photos and text to share who your employees are, who your leaders are, what your workplace is like and what your company values. And continually maintain those pages, interacting and participating in conversations with your potential candidates.

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Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter <![CDATA[9 Things Out of Touch Leaders Do]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13486 2016-01-25T21:29:04Z 2016-01-29T17:00:18Z It’s not uncommon for employees to get the urge to job shop when they find themselves or their careers oppressed by out-of-touch leadership. For most, self-diagnosing for antiquated leadership behavior may seem daunting. As such, the following list provides insight …Read More

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It’s not uncommon for employees to get the urge to job shop when they find themselves or their careers oppressed by out-of-touch leadership. For most, self-diagnosing for antiquated leadership behavior may seem daunting. As such, the following list provides insight into nine things leaders do that show their leadership style may need an overhaul.

1. Lead from an ivory tower. A genuine leader is willing to spend time on the front-line and go shoulder to shoulder in battle. Moreover, serving their staff with expertise and resources rather than dictating orders from their ivory tower will invigorate productivity and morale.

2. Behave autocratically. While many leaders use words like “collaborate” and “brainstorm”, what they really mean is, “I want the rest of my team to assemble to validate how good my ideas are.” If leadership’s agenda and ego are hampering everyone else’s enthusiasm to contribute, expect innovation to plummet.

On the other hand, a modern-day leader understands that, through collaboration, original ideas can be unveiled, and new markets cornered. This rising tide mentality serves individuals and groups well; it also requires leadership to be willing to paddle from the same boat as their crew.

3. Dismiss social media. While there is no single clear path to social media marketing success, an out-of-touch leader refuses to explore this media altogether, or if they do join in, it is with disdain and resistance. Putting blinders on to current marketing and business development trends does not make those trends evaporate. Instead, leaders who are in touch jump into the deep side of the ocean and start paddling. Soon, they will find themselves partaking in treasures broad and deep.

4. Publicly criticize and stir up worry. Today’s leaders praise publically and reprimand privately. For them, signals of distress and agitation are avoidable, only employed when absolutely needed. Contemporary leaders cultivate a culture of positive, authentic communication and clearly articulated objectives, including planning, following up and inspiring their staff to perform with vigor.

5. Pit teams against one another. The slippery slope of competition can shift from healthy to toxic in short order if like-minded teams find themselves at war with one another. Today’s leaders find ways to create collaborative sharing and healthy competition among and between their teams.

6. Never say thank you. If an employee feels they are just a cog in the wheel and are replaceable, their self-worth drops. By expressing appreciation on a regular basis for both the big – and little – things, a leader not only validates, but also motivates the employee to work harder, and grow.

7. Are indifferent to employee differences. While a group of people may hold the same job title, it is unlikely all will perform and produce the same results. Leadership must ensure a proper way to identify, coach and train staff according to their unique styles and also enable high-achievers and producers to be motivated and compensated accordingly.

8. Hire people the same as them. While assembling like-minded people can be amenable to a harmonious culture, it can hamper inventiveness if everyone is too like-minded. In other words, modern leaders look for people who can add value, teach and spark new fire in the minds of the leadership and other team members. Further, today’s leaders are creative in their recruiting and networking techniques, leveraging the vast technological and communication resources available to ferret out the right-fit candidates.

9. Are rigid about schedules. Today’s leadership recognizes that flexible schedules are an advantage: empowering employees with options to work around personal and family obligations; and, empowering employers to flex the schedule in sync with seasonal and marketplace fluctuations and evolving corporate goals.

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Katie Burke <![CDATA[How to Use Negative Reviews to Improve Your Culture]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13482 2016-01-25T20:59:41Z 2016-01-28T17:00:40Z At HubSpot, we are incredibly fortunate. We published a Culture Code that went viral, obsess over our culture as we scale and grow, and invest an inordinate amount of time and effort creating a remarkable employee experience. So you might …Read More

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At HubSpot, we are incredibly fortunate. We published a Culture Code that went viral, obsess over our culture as we scale and grow, and invest an inordinate amount of time and effort creating a remarkable employee experience. So you might think every single one of our Glassdoor reviews is filled with unicorns and rainbows. Alas, that’s not the case.

Like any company, we get reviews on both our candidate and employee experience that are negative in nature. The tone and candor vary widely, and range from a former employee who worked at HubSpot years ago complaining about his manager to a candidate interviewing last week whose interactions with our team were sub-optimal. While I never enjoy seeing a negative review on anything related to HubSpot, I do believe that negative reviews can be a huge opportunity to improve your company’s culture.

Here are three ways to use negative reviews to your advantage as an organization:

1. To make your employment brand more human: Nobody’s job is perfect. Nobody’s company is either. One of the benefits of Glassdoor is that candidates can read real feedback about what your organization is like for employees, past and present. Often, the biggest misfires on hiring are caused by a gap between expectation and reality. Reviews that include negative feedback can help close that gap long before an accepted offer and help prospective employees get a better sense for areas in which your company is unwavering and strong and areas where your company is still working to improve. Your employment brand is human by nature; the occasional reminder to your company and your candidates is a helpful reminder that no place or position is 100% perfect.

2. To provide actionable feedback on ways you can improve: Some negative reviews are vague in nature, but others provide really valuable insights into employee experiences you may not see or hear on a regular basis. For example, humility is a core value at HubSpot, and one thing we saw in a few negative reviews was that it felt that we were getting a bit too self-congratulatory in our overall approach internally. Our team combined that feedback with direct discussions from employees on our engineering team to design a Failure Forum specifically created to focus on mistakes we have made individually and collectively and what we can learn from them. The result? Better clarity on how we can avoid hubris as a force in our company as it grows and a concrete plan of action to help us improve.

3. To start a conversation: Responding to negative reviews with humility and honesty has helped spark some great conversations with employees and candidates on and offline for our team. We’ve received notes from candidates thanking us for taking the time to follow up, held meetings with employees who after a Glassdoor response wanted to meet in person to share their experience, and even had employees raise their hands to say they disagreed with negative views represented in a given post or posts and wanted to talk about how we could share a different perspective.

When someone says something negative about your company and shares it with the world, the natural reaction is to dismiss it or to brush it off as nonsense. But for as many times as I’ve been frustrated at the inaccuracy of a review or a deeply negative write-up after a string of positive ones, less-than-glowing feedback from candidates and employees has helped us improve as a business. Feedback in all its forms helps show your humanity as a business and a brand, presents actionable ideas you can leverage to improve, and ultimately creates opportunities to spark a conversation internally and externally about what is working at your company and what isn’t. So instead of ducking and covering next time a review rolls in, tackle it head on to use it to your advantage.

So next time you get a one star review or see a negative headline, don’t cringe or cry. Instead focus your energy and your company on what constructive feedback can do for your employees, your candidates, your processes, and your business if you listen to the parts that ring true and make real changes to your organization accordingly.

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Michelle Kruse <![CDATA[Choosing from Candidates with Little to No Experience]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13463 2016-02-01T17:34:40Z 2016-01-27T17:00:14Z Hiring the right person is a difficult task, but when your candidate pool consists largely of recent graduates who mostly have little to no experience, that job becomes vastly more challenging. It’s hard to find a winning hand when everyone …Read More

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Hiring the right person is a difficult task, but when your candidate pool consists largely of recent graduates who mostly have little to no experience, that job becomes vastly more challenging. It’s hard to find a winning hand when everyone is holding the same (not so experienced) cards, but in the end, we must always make a decision.

First, take a step back. This situation is not unique—all of us have been there from time to time.  Before you lose yourself amidst a mountain of worry, know this—the right candidate does exist. I stress the word ‘”right,” as all too often we get hung up on the notion of perfection—it doesn’t exist, so kill that thought right now. If you find yourself in a situation where all candidates are equal and making that crucial decision seems impossible, here are some selection methods to consider:

Form a gang

Okay, so don’t go all West Side Story on me—there’s no need for leather jackets or knives. You’ve got a highly qualified consortium at your fingertips: the team that this potential colleague will get to work with. You should use them to your full advantage. Their input is going to be valuable, as this new employee will need to integrate into this team.

Consider bringing your “short list” in to meet the key players, or even better, the entire team. Even an hour of togetherness is plenty of time. As the old adage goes, “First impressions are the most lasting.” Allow the team to provide their feedback, possibly create a rubric and see which candidate is the best fit. From my experience, those who are able to create bonds with their potential teams tend to increase morale and overall productivity.

Call on culture

Since filling an open position is expensive and risky, it’s important to consider who each potential employee will mesh with within your company’s culture.

If you’re not currently enlisting the help of a cultural index, you are missing out on a huge opportunity. Similar to team dynamics, employees who embody the culture of your organization not only tend to be greater producers, but their tenure and long-term contributions to your organization often increase.

Rehearsal reckoning

They say that actions speak louder than words, and in this case, actions speak louder than resumes. If you’re finding yourself stumped, don’t rule out the possibility of a trial run. Whether it be an entire day or another period of time, having the candidates come into the office and dive into a “day-in-the-life” can be well worth the small investment. Remember to set the bar appropriately; asking them to close the biggest deal of the year is probably out of the question, however putting the candidate under a bit of daily stress may be the differentiator you need to make your decision. At worst, you’ll likely narrow down the pool.

Beg the question

There are times when throwing out the time-honored question “Why should we hire you?” is necessary. This may be part of your normal repertoire—if it is, jump directly to the next tip. If not, posing the question and giving consideration to the answers provided may be the perfect way to discern who is really ready to step into the role you have to offer.

Let’s not kid ourselves: Some people are better at interviews than others. While this skill is wonderful for a job seeker, it muddies the waters for those in hiring positions. Asking this pointed question may provide insight and allow those with a clear picture of how they will benefit an organization to shine. Again, let’s be honest: If you’ve got all the right answers but can’t articulate how your hire will positively impact the organization, there’s likely a better-suited candidate.

Grab ahold of your gut

Instinct has guided humans for thousands of years, so why do we all try and dodge its persistent voice? Resumes, tests and interviews may result in attunement, but don’t discount your natural feelings. When all else fails, if that little voice inside your head is telling you what the outcome looks like, there may be good reason.  You may not be able to explain it, but relying on intuition as a rule of measure may be the only way to ascertain the top candidate.

Facing difficult decisions can seem unbearable and at times it can make your head spin. The act of selecting the best employee is made much more difficult when inexperienced candidates come in bulk. If you remain of sound mind, follow the tips above and do what you ultimately believe is best, you’ll be well on your way to choosing the right person for your organization.

Read more of Michelle’s writing on the ResumeEdge Blog, here.

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Christina Comben <![CDATA[How to Manage Employees in Multiple Countries]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13460 2016-01-26T19:16:12Z 2016-01-26T17:00:43Z Whatever line of work you’re in, it’s no surprise that running a successful company is hard work. Many business owners get overwhelmed by the amount of hours they have to put in because they can’t afford to hire help, can’t …Read More

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Whatever line of work you’re in, it’s no surprise that running a successful company is hard work. Many business owners get overwhelmed by the amount of hours they have to put in because they can’t afford to hire help, can’t find the right help, or are simply unable to delegate. But loosening the reigns and assigning tasks to the people who are most suited to carrying them out is vital. Especially if your business is online and your employees are spread out over multiple geographic locations.

While it’s true that the Internet has revolutionized the way we work, giving us access to global talent, international markets, considerate cost savings and maximum productivity; it’s also made it easier for cross-cultural misunderstandings, skipped deadlines and missed warning signs when an employee is failing to pull their weight. Learning to manage your global team effectively will not only ensure that your company is successful, but will help you keep hold of your sanity as well.  

Stay positive

Remember to be positive and passionate above all. If you don’t love what you do and remain enthusiastic about it, it’s hard to transmit that feeling to your employees, especially when you can’t see them face to face. It’s easy to get frustrated when working with people from different cultures, sometimes with limited infrastructure, varying necessities and outlooks, and attributes that seem, well, foreign to your own. Accept that there is more than one way of doing things, that there will always be Internet blackouts, and that communication will probably break down at some point. That’s just part of the package. Energy and enthusiasm at all times will help you overcome the bumps in the road.

Communicate effectively

Use the right communication tools for your business, such as Skype, Asana, Invision, Slack, or Trello, and try to get face-to-face on camera from time to time. Remember that it’s very easy for the tone of voice to be misread when you’re reading – instead of listening to – someone else’s opinion on Skype or G-Chat. Try to use animated gifs occasionally to convey emotion and avoid using sarcasm, teasing, or local jokes and idioms, as they can easily be misunderstood. If you communicate with people in various languages, make sure that everyone involved understands and isn’t guessing at what’s being said.

Take the time to ask your employees how they are before launching into the day’s to-do list and be as available for them as possible. Working from home can be an isolating experience and it can make all the difference to your employees knowing that they’re not alone. Be flexible regarding meeting times when you’re dealing with workers in different time zones. If the last meeting was held late at night for your staff in Australia, then make sure that the next one is adjusted accordingly, so as not to create resentment.

Hire the “writepeople

Because a very large percentage of your business communications (in some cases all) will be via email, chat, or project management software, it’s essential to hire people who know how to write well. They don’t have to be Shakespeare, but if they’re not capable of displaying professionalism and politeness through their words, or enthusiasm and support for other team members, then you’re just asking to upset the apple cart. When hiring new employees, don’t allow the formality to slip just because your communications are by email. Ask for a resume and cover letter. Check for spelling. Detect eagerness. Remember that how they write to you is how they will write to your clients. It’s essential to keep your corporate image in mind at all times.

Create trust

This is probably one of the hardest things to achieve when managing a team of people you can’t see, who are working their shift when you’re not online. It’s impossible to be on top of everyone all of the time and it’s also not healthy to make your employees feel like they’re being constantly watched, or that you don’t trust them. Their results will speak for themselves. Hire new staff for a short trial period before offering a long term contract.

Create a sense of belonging to the company by letting them know that you care about their ambitions and career goals; that you can offer them a long term position with room for growth. Get feedback from other team members and decide on the right hiring method that works for you. Do you prefer contractors who work for short periods, complete the job and then leave, or do you want full time employees with a higher level of involvement and commitment on both sides?

Set goals

If you’re a type-A personality, then it can be hard to accept that all people work at different paces. Don’t create an unrealistic sense of urgency for every task because, when everything is urgent, nothing stands out and therefore effectively nothing is urgent. Set realistic goals. Make people accountable. Use project management software, hold progress meetings, provide incentives, make sure people have a deadline and that everyone is on the same page. Not only will your team have a clearer sense of what everyone else does, but each employee will know when their part has to be completed.

Rome wasn’t built in a day

While starting up an Internet start-up, or expanding an online business is undeniably faster than a traditional bricks and mortar setup, keep in mind that it takes time. You need to establish a reputation for your company, get in good stead with Google, promote your name on social media, build alliances and grow your client base. Building up an international team that you trust isn’t going to happen overnight, so be patient and stay positive; remember you’re in it for the long run and you want like-minded employees who feel the same way.

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Jessica Jones <![CDATA[How to Create a Best-in-Class Candidate Experience]]> https://employers.glassdoor.com/?p=13456 2016-01-15T21:11:43Z 2016-01-25T17:00:11Z The recruiting world is becoming more and more cutthroat. Gone are the days of forcing candidates to jump through hundreds of hoops to prove their commitment and desire to work for you. It has become a two-way conversation for the …Read More

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The recruiting world is becoming more and more cutthroat. Gone are the days of forcing candidates to jump through hundreds of hoops to prove their commitment and desire to work for you. It has become a two-way conversation for the candidate and the company and both parties work to impress one another.

The war for talent is real, and if you truly want to bring the best and brightest into your organization, you have to work for it. That means you have to sell candidates on your organization and why they would want to work there. They need to know what they would be doing every day: who they would work with, what projects they would be given, how they could make an impact. Top talent demands a great experience in the hiring process, as well as the workplace.

Take an honest look at the candidate experience through their eyes and ask yourself if it is one that will separate you from the competition and make your organization desirable.

It starts with the job description. Get rid of the old boring HR mile-long bulleted list and just tell them what they are going to be doing every day and why they want to do it.  Short, simple, and to the point. This is your marketing message—get them to click ‘apply’.

Make the application simple. Candidates won’t spend hours filling out a tedious application and they don’t have to in today’s market. Boil down what you REALLY need to know up front and just ask for that. You can find out the rest when you have a conversation with them.

Know your audience. Understand the demographic and experience level of the person you are targeting and align the interview process accordingly. Consistency is important for each position, but think through what that is for each role and don’t be afraid to cater to your candidate.

Set proper expectations. Let candidates know how long the application will take, how long the interview will be, when they will hear back about the next step, and when a decision will be made. Nothing is worse than having them plan to come for a 30-minute interview and end up stuck there for four hours. Let them know what is expected of them from the very beginning.

Communicate, communicate, communicate. We live in a world of instantaneous feedback. Waiting days, weeks, even months to hear back about a job is not only painful, it is completely ineffective. You will lose top talent if you communicate this way.  Even if the answer is, “I don’t have an answer just yet,” communicate that until you have a better response.

Know what you are looking for before you start interviewing. Using the candidate’s time and the interview process as an exploratory exercise will not make your employment brand best-in-class. Create an experience where the candidate knows what they will be walking into, what is expected in the role, and how the role fits into the organization.

Be timely. Most people will lose interest in a hiring process that drags for months or even weeks. If you do the work ahead of time to define what you are looking for before starting the interview process and dedicate the energy and time to making the hire a priority, you should be able to evaluate your options and make a decision in a reasonable timeframe. For someone making a life change as important as a career move, timing really is everything.

Make it an honest conversation. Understand that the best hires are using the interview process to make a decision about whether the company aligns with them, while you are also determining if the skillset and experience of the person align for you. Provide them with honest information about who you are, what you value, and how you operate. Transparency is key, and providing it up front will ensure that everyone can make the best decision.

Ask for feedback. People will talk about their experience—good or bad. Survey your candidates (hired or not) on how their experience was and hold the recruiters and hiring managers accountable.

The way that you treat your candidates from the moment of their first interaction with your business will have a lasting impact on the way they view the company. This process can truly be a make-or-break situation. When your company’s goal is to hire the best and brightest, having those candidates interested in you and wanting to work for you gives your organization the competitive advantage you want in a difficult job market.

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